All-day podcasts and brick-sized books. Or, why 2015 was the year the long form fought back


This post is by Oliver Burkeman from Books | The Guardian


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Digital-age culture was meant to be bite-sized. But novels are getting longer, and I have learned to enjoy Wilbur Smith Shortly before Christmas, Wilbur Smith, the writer of airport novels, gave an interview to a Sunday newspaper in which he spoke of his four wives in the following tender terms: “Two of them died on me, the first one hates me, and this one loves me, so I’ve covered the whole spectrum.” He no longer saw his children, he added: “They’ve got my sperm, that’s all … it’s sadder for them than it is for me, because they’re not getting any more money.” Perhaps the most charitable response was to observe that at least Smith was being consistent here: the real people in his life seemed as two-dimensional, judging from these descriptions, as the typical Smith hero, who is a rugged outdoorsman with a passion for hunting, hard ...