The Unstable Nature of Reality: The Job of The Wasp by Colin Winnette

The Job of the Wasp stretches the limits of unreliability. Can you have an unreliable narrator, an unreliable setting, and dozens of unreliable supporting characters, any of whom could turn out to be a villain at any moment—or to be the victim to the villainous narrator? It turns out that you can! Or at least, Colin Winnette can, because this book works marvelously as a spooky horror before suddenly becoming a moving tale of alienation.

We begin in media res, with our narrator being welcomed into an orphanage. We have no idea what year it is, what country we’re in, or what happened to our narrator’s parents. He expresses no emotion for them, and only seems concerned with fitting in with the other children. We are told by the headmaster that there are now 31 children in the facility, rather than the governmentally-mandated 30. We are ...