The Darkest Minds is a Grab-Bag YA Dystopia That Manages to Say Nothing Original

The Darkest Minds movie review YA dystopia adaptation

It’s difficult to pinpoint the exact moment that YA dystopia The Darkest Minds feels the most derivative. Honestly, my ennui starts in the first minutes of the movie, with the mysterious disease that kills 90% of the USA’s children and imbues the survivors with powers for reasons, with the suddenly-superpowered children herded into camps and/or experimented on à la The Maze Runner. Then there’s the headscratcher of a cameo in which Gwendoline Christie dons an awful brunette wig to play Lady Jane, a bounty hunter chasing mutants psychically-gifted kids through the woods—the requisite stunt casting like Diane Kruger in The Host, or Patricia Clarkson in Maze. And even the ending shot (bafflingly revealed in every trailer) of Special Girl Ruby (Amandla Stenberg) smearing orange paint across her forehead and raising a hand to the dozens of other kids—painted green, blue, gold—smacks of both Divergent’s color-coded caste systems and ...

The Darkest Minds movie review YA dystopia adaptation detention camps
The Darkest Minds movie review YA dystopia adaptation
The Darkest Minds movie review YA dystopia adaptation
The Darkest Minds movie review YA dystopia adaptation