Russian Doll Reminds Us That We Can’t Help Others Until We Dismantle Our Own Demons


This post is by Emily Asher-Perrin from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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Our cultural approach to the subject of mental health has gotten somewhat healthier over the years. Where discussions of depression, anxiety, therapy, and medication used to be taboo, we are now encouraged (in some spheres, at least) to speak more openly, to connect and reassure each other that no one is alone in these struggles. Celebrities are praised for speaking about mental health in award acceptance speeches; some companies offer mental health days in addition to their sick day policies; scientists are learning that most human beings go through dips and valleys in their mental well being at some point in their lives. As this becomes more common and accepted, it only stands to reason that our stories should reflect this seismic shift—and new Netflix standout Russian Doll aspires to do just that with startling clarity.

[Spoilers for Russian Doll season one.]

Russian Doll follows Nadia Vulvokov as she finds herself ...