Purr-fectly Mediocre — Catwoman

Catwoman made her initial appearance in the very first issue of Batman’s solo title in 1940 as “The Cat.” A cat-burglar named Selina Kyle, she quickly became a popular member of Batman’s rogues’ gallery, and the most prominent female member of same.

The main difference between Catwoman and Batman’s other foes, like the Joker, the Penguin, and so on, was that there was a certain amount of sexual tension. Mostly that was expressed in the middle of the 20th century as good old-fashioned sexism, as Batman treated Catwoman with more respect and a lot of drooling because she was a girl.

Then Catwoman appeared in the 1966 TV series starting Adam West, and her popularity as a character skyrocketed.

Portrayed by Julie Newmar in the first two seasons of the show, by Lee Meriwether in the movie released between those two seasons, and by Eartha Kitt in ...

More Bland Girl Than Bad Girl—Witchblade

Superhero Movie Rewatch Witchblade

While strictly speaking, Image Comics is a comics publisher, in truth, it’s an artist’s collective loosely banded together to publish comics. Each of the founders has his own little corner of it—and some of them split off, with Rob Liefeld and Jim Lee both parting ways with Image at various points. (Lee’s WildStorm imprint became its own company, and then later it was bought by DC.) Others have been brought in, most notably Robert Kirkman, the writer of a comic you might have heard of, The Walking Dead. (I hear there’s a TV show based on it that some folks may have seen…..)

One of Image’s imprints is Marc Silvestri’s Top Cow Productions, which produced a number of superhero comics—but it was their “bad girl” comic, Witchblade, that was their biggest hit, not only as a comic, but also an anime series, a manga adaptation, a Japanese ...

Superhero Movie Rewatch Witchblade
Superhero Movie Rewatch Witchblade
Superhero Movie Rewatch Witchblade
Superhero Movie Rewatch Witchblade

“You’re in love, have a beer” — Hellboy II: The Golden Army

With the first Hellboy movie being a success, it was pretty much a no-brainer for a sequel to be green-lit. The movie not only made money for the studio, it also brought a new audience to Mike Mignola’s comic book.

Unfortunately, there was a snag, in that Revolution Studios, which produced the movie, went out of business in 2006, the same year the sequel was originally scheduled for.

It took a couple years for the rights to find a home, but eventually Universal took on the property, seeing value in it.

Most of the cast was brought back, including Ron Perlman in the title role, Selma Blair as Liz, Doug Jones (providing his own voice this time) as Abe, and Jeffrey Tambor as Manning. Rupert Evans was in a play in London and was unable to return, so Myers was written out of the sequel. (Hellboy got pissed at him ...

“Aw, crap!” — Hellboy

Mike Mignola first came to prominence as an inker with a very distinctive style, lending his unique brushwork to embellish the pencils of other artists in comics from Marvel and DC. In 1993, he created “Hellboy” for a sketch he did at a convention. The character appeared on a cover of Dime Press and then in a story Mignola did with John Byrne for San Diego Comic Con Comics. Eventually, Mignola decided to use that character as the focal point of stories he wanted to tell in his own comics, and a legend was born. Hellboy has appeared in various comics and comics series for the last 25 years.

He also was adapted into screen form, including two live-action movies and two direct-to-DVD animated films.

Hellboy wasn’t intended to be anything other than a cool comics sketch initially, but Mignola was getting the writer bug. He initially pitched Hellboy to ...

“I thought you were cool!” — Elektra

Superhero Rewatch Elektra Jennifer Garner Daredevil

The hilarious thing about Elektra is that she was originally only supposed to appear in one issue and never be seen again.

Elektra first appeared in Frank Miller’s first issue of Daredevil as its full-on writer, issue #168, having been the artist and co-plotter previously, working with Roger McKenzie. She was only meant to be a one-off, a woman from Matt Murdock’s past, done in what was in essence a filler issue enabling Miller to get his sea legs as writer, so to speak.

But the character proved to be hugely popular, and he brought her back six issues later, and Elektra has since then refused to die—or stay dead.

While Miller did bring her back, she was by no means a good guy. Established as a ruthless, sai-wielding bounty hunter in her first appearance, she went on to become the Kingpin of Crime’s chief assassin. Her love for Matt ...

Superhero Rewatch Elektra Jennifer Garner Daredevil
Superhero Rewatch Elektra Jennifer Garner Daredevil
Superhero Rewatch Elektra Jennifer Garner Daredevil
Superhero Rewatch Elektra Jennifer Garner Daredevil
Superhero Rewatch Elektra Jennifer Garner Daredevil
Superhero Rewatch Elektra Jennifer Garner Daredevil

Too Much Plot, Too Little Movie — Spider-Man 3

As was discussed in the comments of last week’s rewatch of Spider-Man 2, it’s arguable who would truly be considered Spider-Man’s greatest foe. The top spot alternates between the Green Goblin (seen in the first movie) and Dr. Octopus (in the sequel).

However, throughout the late 1980s and early 1990s, the most popular villain in Spidey’s rogues’ gallery was definitely Venom. The character proved hugely popular when he first appeared in full on the last page of Amazing Spider-Man #299 in 1988 as this weird evil version of the black costume Spidey had worn for a while after the first Secret Wars miniseries. Venom appeared constantly throughout the Spider-titles, got his own miniseries and later an ongoing series, and was generally Spidey’s most popular foe for the final decade of the 20th century.

So it was inevitable that, having covered two of the biggies, Sam Raimi et al ...