Harlequin Books to be Published Under William Morrow List


This post is by Dianna Dilworth from GalleyCat Feed


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HarperCollins has revealed plans to bring Harlequin’s nonfiction books into the William Morrow family, a move that comes a year after the publishing giant acquired the romance imprint.

“We feel that our longstanding expertise and strength in nonfiction publishing will benefit the Harlequin nonfiction authors and titles,” stated Michael Morrison, president/publisher of HarperCollins. “Therefore, nonfiction titles acquired by Harlequin for August 2015 and beyond will be published on the William Morrow list.”

As part of the shift, former Harlequin editors will join new divisions of HarperCollins. Deborah Brody will join William Morrow on December 1 as Executive Editor. Cara Bedick will join William Morrow on December 1 as Senior Editor. Rebecca Hunt will join the Harper Design group on November 10 as Senior Editor.

Fiction Affliction: May Releases in Fantasy


This post is by Suzanne Johnson from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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new releases fantasy

Twenty-six new fantasies are abloom in May, masking the stealthy genre takeover by young adults! New releases including series additions from, among others, Michelle West (The House War), Ryk E. Spoor (Balanced Sword), Luke Scull (Grim Company), Barb Hendee (Mist-Torn Witches), David Dalglish (Shadowdance), Jeffe Kennedy (The Twelve Kingdoms), and Peter Orullian (Vault of Heaven). Also look for Nos. 19-24 in the Game of Thrones graphic novel series and the ninth “best of sf/f” anthology edited by Jonathan Strahan.

Fiction Affliction details releases in science fiction, fantasy, urban fantasy, paranormal romance, and “genre-benders.” Keep track of them all here. Note: All title summaries are taken and/or summarized from copy provided by the publisher.

[Read about this month’s releases.]

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What Are the Most Profitable Comic Book Movie Franchises?


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Marvel’s Spider-Man is the top grossing movie franchise based on a comic book, according to 24/7 Wall Street. The franchise has grossed $3.96 billion in worldwide sales across its five movies.

DC Comics’ Batman ranked at No. 2 on the list with $3.8 billion in gross earnings worldwide and Marvel’s X-Men ranked at No. 3 on the list with $3.05 billion in gross earnings worldwide.

Follow this link to check out the top 10 list.

Recipes for the perfect picture-book blends of writer and illustrator


This post is by Imogen Russell Williams from Books | The Guardian


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With the right personal alchemy, a writer and illustrator working together can produce storytelling gold

The best illustrated books add up to a great deal more than the sum of their parts. Alchemic interaction between the right words and the right images creates a soaring sense of departure, or total presence in the world of the story. Giggles are amplified into guffaws. Readers are wrung dry of tears and left, desiccated and snuffling, in a grey world of snotty tissue. Bafflingly, though, illustration is often still seen as childish, something to be swiftly moved past – “picture books are for babies”, “yes, but comics aren’t proper books” – en route to maturity, the realm of 8pt fonts and tundras of frozen text.

But this approach favours only the most resolute, confident young bookworms. Big, thick books, with text-dense pages largely unrelieved by images, are intimidating to many children, often representing ...

“A Suit of Armor Around the World”: Avengers: Age of Ultron


This post is by Emily Asher-Perrin from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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Avengers: Age of Ultron

Here’s the deal: We can talk about Avengers: Age of Ultron as a film, or we can talk about it as a piece of the Marvel Cinematic Universe jigsaw puzzle. As a film, it’s a fun action flick with some deeply hilarious plot contrivances. (It’s inevitable with these sorts of stories, really.) As the next step in the MCU arc, it is a joyful smash of all the things that you like in the same place.

See what I did there?

[“You didn’t see that coming?”]

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Snap a Shelfie and Get an Ebook with BitLit!


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Tor Books BitLit app partnership shelfie

Tor Books is thrilled to announce a new partnership with BitLit, a free app that lets you download ebook copies of your paper library. By partnering with BitLit, we’ve made it possible for you to be able to download an ebook for any Tor/Forge book you own in print!

[Read more]

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Bay Area Free Book Exchange is Closing


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The Bay Area Free Book Exchange, a public book exchange that has given away more than half a million books since 2009, is shutting its doors due to a “massive rent increase.” The rent is reportedly going up 70 percent, according to SF Gate.

“So far, there are no plans to relocate as we haven’t found an affordable space in the nearby areas,” explains the website.

The East Bay organization operated by taking book donations, selling some books on eBay in order to pay the bills and then giving the rest away for free. The service will close permanently on May 17th. Until then, readers can still donate and take books every weekend 9am-6pm. “All books on All shelves are FREE!!; but we do have a limit of 100 books per person per day,” explains the organization’s site.

An Uncut and Non-Remastered List of Star Wars Editions!


This post is by Leah Schnelbach from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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Star Wars Uncut

The thing that makes Star Wars truly great is Greedo shooting first. Wait, come back, I’m being serious! The original Star Wars trilogy was an incredible cultural touchstone, and obviously Star Wars merchandise and expanded universe novels created a whole world for fans to inhabit. However, the moment when Star Wars became truly great was the moment in 1997 when a generation of fans had to examine what this film meant to them, and why it was so important that Han shoot first. This moment galvanized an already fervent fandom to, if you don’t mind me mixing my geek metaphors, play Sam Beckett in the SWU, going back to earlier prints of the films to put right what Lucas had made wrong.

Using the sort of film tech popularized by Lucas himself, the fandom dove in and started making new editions of the original trilogy, and then turned their scalpels ...

Poem of the week: Selling His Soul by Sophie Hannah


This post is by Carol Rumens from Books | The Guardian


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The formal conservatism of Sophie Hannah’s Selling His Soul does nothing to restrict this elegant love poem’s unsettling message

Selling His Soul

When someone says they have a poet’s soul
You can imagine laughing in their face –
A sensible reaction on the whole
But he convinced me that it was the case
And that his poet’s soul was out of place
What with his body selling advertising space.

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Morning Roundup: Happy May the 4th!


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Hungarian Star Wars poster

May the 4th is obviously a big day around these parts, and what better way to celebrate than with a deliciously loopy Hungarian Star Wars poster? This art, created by the fantastic Tibor Helényi, doesn’t bother with Luke, Leia, or Han—it goes straight for the all-important GIANT LIZARD MONSTER. It also creates some pretty cool symbolism of conflating the Death Star with Darth Vader’s heart. See the way the X-wing is blasting into a trench that’s also part of Vader’s billowing cloak? Pretty snazzy. You can see more of Helényi’s work over at Dangerous Minds!

Morning Roundup brings you thoughts on Black Widow and Silent Hill, facts about The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy just sure to impress cocktail party guests, and a new game from the creator of Threes!

[Plus our real-life Tony Stark analog has come back from the future with stuff for us!]

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Virtual Library of Babel makes Borges’s infinite store of books a reality – almost


This post is by Guardian Staff from Books | The Guardian


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Jorge Luis Borges’s 1941 tale about a library containing every possible combination of letters – every work that could ever be written – has come to life online. And its creator is no closer to finding anything new that makes sense

Jorge Luis Borges’s fictional librarian claimed to have discovered books entitled “The Combed Thunderclap”, “The Plaster Cramp” and “Axaxaxas mlő” within the endless walls of the Library of Babel. So far, writer Jonathan Basile’s trawling of his digital version of the library has only yielded the title Dog.

Borges’s seminal 1941 story imagined an almost infinite library containing every possible combination of letters in a vast collection of 410-page books. “The universe (which others call the Library),” it begins, “is composed of an indefinite and perhaps infinite number of hexagonal galleries … The Library is total and ... its shelves contain all the possible combinations of the 20-odd orthographic symbols ... ...

The Life of Saul Bellow: To Fame and Fortune 1915-1964 review – a dizzyingly detailed case for the defence


This post is by Tim Adams from Books | The Guardian


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Saul Bellow’s contradictory traits are explored in this thorough first volume of his biography

One morning in the spring of 1949, Saul Bellow was walking along a Parisian street to the Left Bank hotel room he was renting for a dollar a day as a study, when he experienced a revelation. Bellow had been staying in the city over the winter with his wife, Anita, and five-year-old son, Gregory, in order to make progress on his third novel, The Crab and the Butterfly. Paris was still at sea after occupation; the few writers and editors Bellow had encountered were unmoored, like him, by each newly published survivor’s report of concentration camps. The Crab and the Butterfly, only a chapter of which remains, reflected that dislocating anxiety.

It was, Bellow later recalled, a novel featuring “two men in a hospital room, one dying, the other trying to keep him from ...

Star Wars retold: we’ve felt the force – in pictures


This post is by Jack and Holman Wang from Books | The Guardian


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To celebrate Star Wars Day (May the 4th be with you etc), twins Jack and Holman Wang show us how they meticulously recreate settings and scenes from the Star Wars saga to exact 7:1 scale in order to make their gorgeous Epic Yarns board books, for small jedis and princesses everywhere (and bigger ones too!)

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Critical Notes: Jane Smiley, Toni Morrison, Kate Atkinson, and more


This post is by Carmela Ciuraru from Critical Mass


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Your reviews seed this roundup; please send items, including new about your new publications and recent honors, to NBCCCritics@gmail.com. Make sure to send links that do not require a subscription or username and password.

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* Please join the NBCC on Wednesday, May 27th, in New York: It's the first day of BEA, and a number of activities are planned, including the annual mmbership meeting, a panel discussion, and a cocktail reception at the Center for Fiction. You can find out the details here.

Steven Kellman reviews "Lifted By the Great Nothing," by Karim Dimechkie, for the San Antonio Current.

Carl Rollyson reviews a new biography of T. S. Eliot for the Star Tribune.

John Strawn on Jon Ronson and Toni Morrison for The Oregonian.

NBCC Board Member Jane Ciabattari picks 10 books to read in May for her Between the Lines book column for BBC.com, now in the UK ...

The World Beyond Your Head review – philosophical inquiry that demands your attention


This post is by Iain Morris from Books | The Guardian


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Though you may need a quiet room to read it in, Matthew Crawford’s study of our distracting modern age is a rewarding one

If an attention deficit is the mental equivalent of obesity, perhaps politicians should be more worried about slack minds than flabby waistlines. The bleep of a text message or the flickering image on a TV screen in a communal area may be distracting enough. But public spaces that used to be shielded from unnecessary disturbance are being colonised by the captains of commerce. The lipstick advert that glares out of a baggage tray at airport security is an egregious example, writes Matthew Crawford.

With so many demands on our attention, it seems little wonder it is in short supply. Yet our susceptibility to these forces is not the fault of newfangled technologies like the mobile phone, according to the author. Rather, it is the natural consequence of ...