Amazon Announces That its Middle-earth Series Will be Shot in New Zealand


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New Zealand will once again be home to Middle-earth. Amazon announced that its upcoming series based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s Legendarium will begin production in Auckland “in the coming months.”

The series is expected to take place in the Second Age of Middle-earth, potentially set in Númenor, Tolkien’s version of Atlantis, and prior to the forging of the Rings of Power.

In its press release, showrunners and executive producers J.D. Payne and Patrick McKay said that they “needed to find somewhere majestic, with pristine coasts, forests, and mountains, that also is a home to world-class sets, studios, and highly skilled and experienced craftspeople and other staff.” The release didn’t come with any information on casting, or when the series is expected to debut on Amazon Prime Video.

In July, Amazon announced its production team for the series, which includes familiar names such as Tom Shippey, John ...

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Amazon Announces That its Middle-earth Series Will be Shot in New Zealand


This post is by Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




New Zealand will once again be home to Middle-earth. Amazon announced that its upcoming series based on J.R.R. Tolkien’s Legendarium will begin production in Auckland “in the coming months.”

The series is expected to take place in the Second Age of Middle-earth, potentially set in Númenor, Tolkien’s version of Atlantis, and prior to the forging of the Rings of Power.

In its press release, showrunners and executive producers J.D. Payne and Patrick McKay said that they “needed to find somewhere majestic, with pristine coasts, forests, and mountains, that also is a home to world-class sets, studios, and highly skilled and experienced craftspeople and other staff.” The release didn’t come with any information on casting, or when the series is expected to debut on Amazon Prime Video.

In July, Amazon announced its production team for the series, which includes familiar names such as Tom Shippey, John ...

🇳🇿

V.E. Schwab’s The Archived Book Series Being Adapted for The CW


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V.E. Schwab

A new team of ghost hunters are making their way to The CW Network.

V. E. Schwab’s The Archived is currently being developed  for the CW, according to Variety.

The team behind Jane the Virgin, writer Liz Scudlo, and creator and showrunner Jennie Snyder Urman, will be adapting the book series’s universe.

In the series, the eldest child in a family of ghost hunters, Bex has trained her entire life for the day she’ll take up the mantle of “the chosen one.” But when her dad dies and her local-weather-girl sister wakes up with the familial powers instead, these night-and-day sisters will have to figure out how to work together and save the world.

Author V.E. Schwab sounded off on the announcement:

Sleeps With Monsters: Is This the Book I Wanted to Read?


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A difficulty haunts me, now, when I’m reviewing or otherwise critiquing books: am I judging the book I in fact read, or the one I wanted to read? Sometimes they’re the same thing. Often they’re not, and the question of how much I resent the novel in front of me for not being different in these specific ways becomes a live and pressing issue.

Part of that’s because I need to reconcile myself to living with my brain on some degree of burnout for the foreseeable future. (It’s dreadfully frustrating to feel duller and more stupid than one used to be all the time.) Part of it, though, is that I’ve been spoiled in the past while by the number of books I’ve read in which queerness was both present (prominent) and unremarkable. It seems I’ve come to expect an acknowledgement that people like me can (do more than ...

Steel Crow Saga Sweepstakes!


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Four destinies collide in a unique fantasy world of war and wonders, where empire is won with enchanted steel and magical animal companions fight alongside their masters in battle in Paul Krueger’s Steel Crow Saga – and we want to send you a copy!

 

A soldier with a curse
Tala lost her family to the empress’s army and has spent her life avenging them in battle. But the empress’s crimes don’t haunt her half as much as the crimes Tala has committed against the laws of magic . . . and against her own flesh and blood.

Joe Abercrombie’s A Little Hatred: A Book at War With Its Past


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What must it feel like to live in your own legend?

This is one of the key themes of Joe Abercrombie’s books: characters swept up in their own narrative, sometimes willingly, more often not. The burden of being a Named Man or a hero; the heart of the narrative, the one in the spotlight and the storybook.

Over the course of the six preceding books in the universe of The First Law, we’ve seen characters work their entire lives to become heroes, and others cross continents to run from their past. We’ve seen villains use stories to deceive and heroes deliberately foster lies. In The First Law, we read an entire trilogy set around manipulation—a conventional, page-perfect epic fantasy in which everything was a lie, and, yet, somehow it didn’t matter. In Best Served Cold, Abercrombie wrote a master-class on perspective: how heroism, vengeance, ambition, and cruelty are all ...

Rereading The Ruin of Kings: Chapters 62 and 63


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CAKE OR DEATH, Tor.com? Cake? Well, we’re OUT of cake! So instead, have a RROK Goddess of Death with your afternoon tea, won’t you? I thought you would!

This blog series will be covering The Ruin of Kings, the first novel of a five-book series by Jenn Lyons. Previous entries can be found here in the series index.

Today’s post will be covering Chapter 62, “The Gryphon Ring”, and Chapter 63, “Tea with Death.” Please note that from this point forward, these posts will likely contain spoilers for the entire novel, so it’s recommended that you read the whole thing first before continuing on.

Got that? Great! Click on for the rest!

 

Chapter 62: The Gryphon Ring (Talon’s story)

[In which a boy, a thief and an expository interlude walk into a bar, and stop me if you’ve heard this one]

You probably haven’t heard this ...

Grass Is Terrifying in the First Trailer for Netflix’s In the Tall Grass Adaptation


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“Grass, but make it scary” may seem like a dubious set-up for a horror story, but the first trailer for Netflix’s upcoming adaptation of Stephen King and Joe Hill’s novella actually makes the humble lawn plant quite terrifying indeed.

Even before the premise is introduced, the clip opens with shots of breeze passing unsettlingly through the titular tall grass. This freaky field of green is then revealed to be unfathomably large, and inside, there’s a young boy yelling for help. Siblings Becky and Cal get out of the car to look for him, and what starts off as a simple Good Samaritanic deed devolves into an unending night (or week, or month) of disorientation, dehydration, lost signals, unsavory technological glitches, mud (yes, the mud is scary here, too), vultures, and mind-bending hallucinations (or are they???).

The source material, written by the father-son duo, was first published back in 2012 ...

Highlights from Tamsyn Muir’s r/Books AMA


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Tamsyn Muir’s epic-sci-fi-fantasy-necromantic-comedy debut, Gideon the Ninth, published last week. (From the writer herself: “Everyone agrees that Charles Stross put it best when he described it as Lesbian necromancers explore a haunted gothic palace in space! although I also really liked it when he just said Skeletons!”) To celebrate, the Nebula/World Fantasy Award/Shirley Jackson-nominated author dropped by r/Books for an AMA, and it’s chock-full of writing advice, fun facts about the world of the Ninth House trilogy, forthcoming book news, jokes, skeletons, big influences, thoughts on the HYPE, and more.

Check out the highlights below, and head on over to the AMA itself for more genre-busting goth goodness!

 

On her favorite Gideon the Ninth line:

I love being asked my favourite line!! You get two, which is my favourite line FROM the book, when Ianthe is talking about a particular skull, a line that only I love—

...

Spock and the Myth of “Emotion Versus Logic”


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Spock, Star Trek Discovery, season 2

Look, I’m just saying that Spock was wrong.

Not about everything, of course. But about his developmental crux, the war going on betwixt his delightfully pointed ears. People love to talk about Spock’s struggle to reconcile the two natures within him—the rational, staid pragmatism of Vulcan and the wild, untempered emotionality of Earth. The half-vulcan half-human spends his entire life trying to accommodate these halves, and seems to wind up somewhere in the middle. He takes what’s best from both of his ancestral cultures and knits them together beautifully, evolving into a mature and centered being.

Except that’s not what happened at all.

Here’s the problem: Binary thinking permeates our culture. People tout the differences between men and women (Mars and Venus!), divide fictional characters into “heroes” and “villains”, insist that cats and dogs are complete opposites despite their many similarities. One of our favorite binaries is how we ...

Spock, Star Trek Discovery, season 2
Star Trek Original Series, Spock and Kirk, The Galileo Seven
Michael and Spock, Star Trek Discovery, season 2
Michael and Spock, Star Trek Discovery, season 2

Handmaid’s sales: Margaret Atwood’s The Testaments is immediate hit


This post is by Alison Flood and Jade Cuttle from Books | The Guardian


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Novelist’s return to the dystopia of Gilead sold more than 100,000 copies in hardback in its first week on sale in the UK

A hardback copy of Margaret Atwood’s follow-up to The Handmaid’s Tale, The Testaments, was sold every four seconds in the UK last week, according to sales figures that show the dystopian novel racing to the top of this week’s book charts.

Published at midnight on Monday, The Testaments had sold 103,177 hardbacks by Saturday, according to official book sales monitor Nielsen BookScan. Set 15 years after the end of The Handmaid’s Tale, the novel traces the continued evolution of Atwood’s totalitarian state of Gilead, where women are reduced to their wombs and justification is found in the Bible for every abuse of power.

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Mr. Robot Creator Sam Esmail Is Rebooting Battlestar Galactica


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Looks like it’s Battlestar Galactica’s turn to go through the reboot machine—again. According to Deadline, this time, it will be helmed by none other than Mr. Robot creator Sam Esmail. NBC Universal, which gave us the critically acclaimed first Battlestar Galactica reboot in the 2000’s, made the announcement on Tuesday.

Deadline reports that this will be just one of several  reboots (including Saved By the Bell and Punky Brewster) that will be launched on NBCUniversal’s new streaming service, Peacock, which will also have some original content in store when it launches in April 2020.

That’s literally all we (or anyone presumably not under an NDA) knows about the new Battlestar Galactica, including, uh, why. Deadline reports that they “hear” Esmail is a “huge fan of BG,” but he has yet to publicly comment on this decision.

Over at Tor.com HQ, this news prompted immediate ...

Thousands demand Oxford dictionaries ‘eliminate sexist definitions’


This post is by Alison Flood from Books | The Guardian


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Nearly 30,000 people have signed petition calling on the publisher to cut entries that ‘discriminate against and patronise women’

Almost 30,000 people have signed a petition calling for Oxford University Press to change the “sexist” definitions of the word “woman” in some of its dictionaries.

Launched this summer by Maria Beatrice Giovanardi, the petition points out that Oxford dictionaries contain words such as “bitch, besom, piece, bit, mare, baggage, wench, petticoat, frail, bird, bint, biddy, filly” as synonyms for woman. Sentences chosen to show usage of the word woman include: “Ms September will embody the professional, intelligent yet sexy career woman” and “I told you to be home when I get home, little woman”. Such sentences depict “women as sex objects, subordinate, and/or an irritation to men”, the petition says.

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You Wouldn’t Believe How Lonely You Get: Five Terrible Ways to Live Forever in SFF (And One That’s Actually Pretty Good)


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Science fiction and fantasy are full of horrible ways you can die, but the genre has also been pretty inventive in horrible ways to live forever. There’s something about the fantasy of never dying that brings out the pedant and the cynic in us all. What would you do with all that time? Wouldn’t you lose your humanity? Surely there’d have to be an awful downside? And, of course – what terrible thing would you do to get it?

In Greek myth, Tithonus asked for eternal life, but forgot about eternal youth, and shriveled up into a grasshopper. Immortality always has a gotcha clause. Maybe it’s just too good to be true, or too painful to imagine, given that it’s not something we’re ever going to get. Either way, if you really want to live forever you’d better read the small print.

 

The Homeward Bounders by Diana Wynne Jones

...

Reading the Wheel of Time: The Rise of the Evil Bubbles in Robert Jordan’s The Shadow Rising (Part 4)


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Reading The Wheel of Time on Tor.com: The Shadow Rising

Perrin and Faile find the halls of the Stone surprisingly busy with both off-duty Defenders as well as servants making their way to and fro. Perrin keeps his head down unless he is right in the light of a torch, not wanting people to observe his eyes glowing gold in the dim parts of the hall. No one has mentioned his eyes, of course, not now as servants bow as they pass or at other times—not even Faile has asked him about them—but Perrin still feels uneasy whenever someone seems to notice his golden gaze, and when they don’t say anything, it reminds him of how apart he is from other people.

The Defenders mostly bow when Perrin and Faile pass, but they also start or give them suspicious looks before hurrying away as if they are afraid of Perrin, which puts him on edge. He wonders aloud to Faile ...

Joe Abercrombie: ‘I think the combination of violence and humour wasn’t an immediate easy sell’


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The leading grimdark author, known for his cynical and violent fantasy novels, is back in the world of the First Law – along with a lot more women ...

British author Joe Abercrombie may have sold five million copies of his violent, darkly humorous fantasy novels, and had his books praised by reigning overlord of the genre, George RR Martin (“bloody and relentless”). But the first time he sat down to write what he believed would be “the great British fantasy novel”, it didn’t go well.

Growing up on David Eddings and Dragonlance, Abercrombie was aiming for full-blown epic fantasy when he made a stab at his own novel in his early 20s. He managed a few chapters, but it was “absolutely pompous”, he admits now, away from his home in Bath to meet with his publishers in London.

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Download a Free Ebook of New Spring, a Wheel of Time Novel by Robert Jordan, Before Sept. 21


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The Wheel of Time, New Spring by Robert Jordan

For three days battle has raged in the snow around the great city of Tar Valon. In the city, a Foretelling of the future is uttered. On the slopes of Dragonmount, the immense mountain that looms over the city, is born an infant prophesied to change the world.

Moiraine Damodred, soon to be raised to Aes Sedai, must find this child.

Each month, the Tor.com eBook Club gives away one (or two, or five last June!) free sci-fi/fantasy ebook to club subscribers. For September 2019, the Ebook Club pick is Robert Jordan’s stand-alone Wheel of Time novel NEW SPRING.

Robert Jordan’s epic fantasy series The Wheel of Time is heading to screens soon (filming began this month!), with an initial season focused from the viewpoint of Moiraine Damodred, the One Power-wielding Aes Sedai who stumbles upon Rand, Mat, Perrin, Egwene, and Nynaeve in an out-of-the-way village ...

The Wheel of Time New Spring by Robert Jordan ebook cover
Warrior of the Altaii by Robert Jordan

Russian comics get sales boost after culture minister calls them ‘pathetic’


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Vladimir Medinsky’s comments have sparked backlash from fans and boosted sales, according to one Russian publisher

The Russian culture minister’s dismissal of comic books as “for those who can’t read well” has sparked a backlash from fans but also boosted sales of the genre, according to one publisher.

The minister, Vladimir Medinsky, told an audience at the Moscow international book fair that comics are “like chewing gum, it’s not food”. “Comic books are aimed at children who are only learning to read,” he added. “I think it’s pathetic for adults to read comic books.”

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Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day is charming, but it is also racist


This post is by Sam Jordison from Books | The Guardian


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Winifred Watson’s daffy characters are inclined to cheerful antisemitism, at a time when Nazism was taking over Europe. Can we still enjoy it?

In last week’s article on Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day, I started with a silly but sweet bit of innuendo. It seemed a good way to introduce a book that is, for most of its 233 pages, a light, frothy delight and widely loved as a feelgood read, so much so that it was chosen as our “fun” book for September.

I understand readers’ affection; for the most part, I share it. But there’s no getting around the feel-bad aspects of Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day, specifically – as a few of you have pointed out – some distinctly racist passages.

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Isadora review – glorious art of a dervish


This post is by Rachel Cooke from Books | The Guardian


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The avant garde dancer’s wild life is celebrated in Julie Birmant and cartoonist Clément Oubrerie’s clever retelling

In the public imagination, the avant garde dancer Isadora Duncan often appears as a somewhat ridiculous figure: a tunic-wearing, self-taught dervish whose art could be almost as vulgar as it was glorious. If her death at the age of 50, when her trailing scarf became caught in the wheels of the car in which she was travelling, still seems sad and wasteful, there’s also, at this distance, something blackly comical about it: the hand-painted, floating ribbon of silk that killed her speaks of an exuberance that was never practical, and only very rarely wise.

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