The Fantastical Food of Fantasy Fiction


This post is by Beth Cato from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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Two words for you: Turkish Delight.

In a discussion of food in the fantasy genre, we may as well start with one of most well-known examples. When I read the Narnia books at age 12—an age when I fervently wanted magic to be real—I was overwhelmed with curiosity about this mysterious confection called Turkish Delight. I mean, it had to be really good for Edmund Pevensie to sell off his family to the White Witch.

The Narnia books were not favorites of mine—my preference went to Prydain—but that mention of Turkish Delight stuck with me. Later in my teen years when I visited a Cost Plus World Market for the first time, I encountered the candy for sale. I had to buy it.

I also had to throw it away because I found it to be outright vile.

Yes, I know the version I had wasn’t legit Turkish Delight. What ...

Moral Kombat: How Narnia and Harry Potter Wrestle with Death and Rewrite Christianity


This post is by Leah Schnelbach from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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Hagrid carries Harry's body

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child has been on Broadway for about six months and collected six Tonys after a successful run in London. I was lucky enough to see the play a few months ago, and while I liked it enormously, I can’t stop thinking about how odd it is. With Cursed Child, Rowling foregoes the possibility of a simple fun adventure and instead adds a coda to the series-long meditation on death, and continues her ongoing tickle fight conversation with the moral fantasy of C.S. Lewis.

Has there ever been a blockbuster/franchise/pop-culture-phenomenon more death-obsessed than Harry Potter? The Narnia books at least give us pages full of whimsy and adventure before cranking the stakes up. Death looms over The Hunger Games, obviously, but the books are also about political strife and governmental overthrow and class warfare. Star Wars tends to sanitize its deaths, with lightsabers ...

Aslan dead
story of the Deathly Hallows
James Potter Lily Potter grave
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Dumbledore Pensieve
Hagrid tied up
Kings Cross afterlife Harry Potter
Harry Potter and Cedric Diggory

The Fantastical Food of Fantasy: Magic Made Real


This post is by Beth Cato from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Two words for you: Turkish Delight.

In a discussion of food in the fantasy genre, we may as well start with one of most well-known examples. When I read the Narnia books at age 12—an age when I fervently wanted magic to be real—I was overwhelmed with curiosity about this mysterious confection called Turkish Delight. I mean, it had to be really good for Edmund Pevensie to sell off his family to the White Witch.

The Narnia books were not favorites of mine—my preference went to Prydain—but that mention of Turkish Delight stuck with me. Later in my teen years when I visited a Cost Plus World Market for the first time, I encountered the candy for sale. I had to buy it.

I also had to throw it away because I found it to be outright vile.

Yes, I know the version I had wasn’t legit Turkish Delight. What ...

Netflix Developing The Chronicles of Narnia as TV Series and Films


This post is by Stubby the Rocket from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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Chronicles of Narnia adaptation Netflix TV movies

In 2016, the Mark Gordon Company, Entertainment One, and The C.S. Lewis Company announced a revival of the Chronicles of Narnia films, intending to start over with The Silver Chair as separate from the prior novels adapted for the big screen by Walt Disney Pictures (2005’s The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe; 2008’s Prince Caspian; and 2010’s Voyage of the Dawn Treader). Now, the latest announcement comes from Netflix, which is partnering with The C.S. Lewis Company to develop all seven Narnia books into either movies or television series.

“It is wonderful to know that folks from all over are looking forward to seeing more of Narnia, and that the advances in production and distribution technology have made it possible for us to make Narnian adventures come to life all over the world,” said Douglas Gresham, Lewis’ stepson, in the official announcement. ...

This Harry Potter Crossover Fic Will Destroy You (In A Good Way)


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Author Burgandi Rakoska snared our hearts today when we discovered this Tumblr post about post-school Harry Potter figuring out adult life after being a Chosen One. The unlikely friendship that he forms with a familiar older woman will undoubtedly bring a tear (or two) to the eye.

Prepare to have feelings:

Harry Potter/Narnia xover fic Burgandi Rakoska

Harry Potter/Narnia xover fic Burgandi Rakoska

Obviously fantasy enthusiasts and authors have long circled back on the raw deal bestowed upon Susan Pevensie at the end of the Narnia series, but there’s something particularly moving about Susan and a young Harry getting to bond over how they’re treated in their respective realms. The level of scrutiny that both of them faced as children is deeply painful to witness as readers. The thought that they could offer each other some measure of comfort in that connection is a little like balm on a wound.

Check out the rest of Rakoska’s Tumblr and take a peek at ...

How Fantasy Candy Kingdoms Have Evolved Over 200 Years


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Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory

Fantasy fiction has a sweet tooth. It seems that worlds full of magic and mayhem need sugar to keep their denizens powered through endless winters, strange adventures, and harrowing school years. We’ve assembled a brief chronology of sugary tales (eschewing video games for the time being. The Mario games alone could fill a book with candy worlds) containing our favorite (and often very magical) cakes, cookies, and candies—from an edible cottage set deep in the woods, to the enchanted sweets hidden in the robes of our favorite Headmaster…

 

“Hansel and Gretel” (1812)

Illustration by Arthur Rackham (The Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, 1909)

Hansel and Gretel live with their parents at the edge of a deep, dark, extremely Germanic forest. Their parents decide it costs too much to feed them, and concoct a plan to take the siblings into the forest and abandon them. But, as ...

The Nutcracker and the Mouse King
Alice in Wonderland fantasy confections drink me eat me Mad Hatter Tea Party
Moomins and the Great Flood
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
where to start with Seanan McGuire's books Beneath the Sugar Sky Wayward Children

Where Should You Start Reading The Chronicles of Narnia?


This post is by Mari Ness from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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As someone who has been known to start series smack in the middle—with both books and television shows—I tend to be a bit agnostic on the question of “what order should I read/watch these in?” With three exceptions:

Legends of Tomorrow, which everyone, without exception, should start in the second season, only tackling the first season much, much later after getting a chance to realize that these characters can actually be fun.

Blackadder, which everyone, without exception, should also start in the second season, only in this case, never return to the first season at all.

And The Chronicles of Narnia, which everyone, without exception, should read in publication order.

That is:

  1. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
  2. Prince Caspian
  3. The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
  4. The Silver Chair
  5. The Horse and His Boy
  6. The Magician’s Nephew
  7. The Last Battle

At least for the first read.

...

Through a Magic Doorway: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe


This post is by Mari Ness from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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The Wardrobe in The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis opens with one of the most magical sequences in children’s literature, as a child opens a very ordinary door to find herself stumbling into magic. It is a tale of children sent away from war only to find themselves in the middle of a very real and unreal one; a tale of how trying to escape danger may put you into worse danger, human or witch; a hodgepodge of fairy tale, Roman myth, Norse tales, Christian theology, talking animals, Father Christmas and an inexplicable lamp post that has somehow been burning with no source of electricity, gas or other fuel for centuries. It absolutely should not work on any level. And yet it does.

Its author, C. S. Lewis, was an Oxford don, influential literary critic and Christian writer. His (allegedly) non traditional relationship with a Mrs. Moore while ...

When Gender Bias Extends to the Animal Kingdom: C.S. Lewis’ The Horse and His Boy


This post is by Judith Tarr from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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All I remembered of C.S. Lewis’ The Horse and His Boy before yesterday when I sat down and read it again was the part about the horse teaching the boy how to ride. That was going to be the subject of this week’s column, with reference to Col. Alois Podhajsky’s My Horses, My Teachers, and a rumination on the horse as teacher. That’s still on my list for Columns I Want To Write, but as I read the book, I went off in a different direction. The book has serious problems for modern readers—the racism hits you right in the face on the first page—but it’s also rather less accurate on the equestrian front than I’d remembered. That dratted Suck Fairy, it splurts all over the damnedest things. Nevertheless, there’s still some good in it, and the idea that a human can learn riding from a horse makes ...

Narnia Meets Game of Thrones in the New Trailer for The Magicians Season 2


This post is by Natalie Zutter from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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The Magicians season 2 trailer kings queens Fillory Narnia Game of Thrones

“What a lovely surprise. A bunch of my students went and conquered another world. The very least I can do is help you rule it.”

Dean Fogg about sums up the second trailer for season 2 of Syfy’s The Magicians: Quentin and the rest of his Brakebills classmates are following in the footsteps of Narnia’s Pevensies by crowning themselves the kings and queens of Fillory. But it’s not all flowers and peace, as the new rulers must contend with northern and southern enemies, a god that needs killing, some pesky magic issues caused by the Beast, and their own fragile friendships that might break apart in the process. Or, as Margo tells Eliot, “Get over yourself, Ned Stark. People are gonna die no matter what. Just try to make sure it isn’t you.”

The Magicians season 2 premieres January 25.

Aslan-Dog Has Come to Rescue Us from a Land Where It’s Always Autumn, but Never Halloween


This post is by Leah Schnelbach from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe Each year festive packs of puppers and doggos roam New York’s dog parks in the best Halloween finery their human minions could convince them to wear. Gothamist posted one of our favorite entries from last years Great PUPkin Dog Costume Contest in Fort Greene Park: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe – the Wardbrobe thoughtfully carrying Mr. Tumnus’ lamppost around as well. We’re not sure where Halloween fits into Narnia’s endless, Christmas-less winter, but we’re glad this pup’s humans let him release his inner Aslan. [via Gothamist!]

Why Was Turkish Delight the Ultimate Temptation in C.S. Lewis’ Narnia?


This post is by Leah Schnelbach from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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Edmund eats Turkish Delight under the watchful eye of the White Witch It’s a question that has haunted every Narnia fan: WHY TURKISH DELIGHT? Why would Edmund Pevensie willingly sell his family (and, allegorically at least, his soul) to the White Witch for boxes of candy? I mean:

While he was eating the Queen kept asking him questions. At first Edmund tried to remember that it is rude to speak with one’s mouth full, but soon he forgot about this and thought only of trying to shovel down as much Turkish Delight as he could, and the more he ate the more he wanted to eat, and he never asked himself why the Queen should be so inquisitive. She got him to tell her that he had one brother and two sisters, and that one of his sisters had already been in Narnia and had met a Faun there, and that no one except himself and his brother and his sisters knew ...

Dreams, Destinies, and Opposable Thumbs: The Chosen Children of Portal Fantasy


This post is by Seanan McGuire from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


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Alice-Disney Let’s talk about doors for a moment, you and I. Let’s talk about the power of something closed, whether or not it’s been forbidden; the mystery of the trapdoor that leads up into the attic, the powerful draw of the locked hatch that leads down into the cellar, the irresistible temptation of someone else’s fridge or medicine cabinet. We want to know what’s on the other side—and I don’t mean we want to be told. We want to see. We want to look with our own eyes, and know that no one can take that looking away from us. People are curious. It’s one of our defining characteristics. We want to know. Children’s stories are filled with doors just begging to be opened, and some of the best and most beloved of those stories are about opening those doors. About traveling over the rainbow to a magical, Technicolor land where ...
Every Heart a Doorway cover reveal Seanan McGuire

Galloping Straight Into Our Hearts: The Greatest Horses of Fantasy


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Li'l Sebastian

Even in our normal, mundane reality, horses are amazing—it’s no wonder, then, that so many horses are also found in our ancient myths, legends, and modern fantasy tales. Whether they’re magical or not, these equine beauties are often vital to the hero’s quest, making it possible to reach hidden lands, slay hideous monsters, or just carry enough supplies for a month’s worth of second breakfasts.

Though we couldn’t possibly compile a complete list of fantasy horses (The Lord of the Rings alone would take forever to catalog), we’ve attempted to corral our favorites into one place. Like the Mustang on the plains, or the feral ponies of Chincoteague, we’re sure a few have escaped our snares, so let us know those we missed in the comments!

 

Bela—The Wheel of Time Series

Bela Flees Mashadar, Wheel of Time

Bela and Egwene al’Vere flee in “Mashadar” by artist Josh Hass

Obviously when you have an epic ...

Epona with Link in Ocarina of Time
Pegasus in The Clash of the Titans
Tir na Nog, Into the West
Artax in The Neverending Story
Brego with Aragorn
yfandes-valdemar
Khal Drogo and Daenarys Targaryen with their horses
Swift Wind with Sha-Ra
Goliath in Ladyhawke
badhorse-ELE
Binky with DEATH and Discworld
Art by Pauline Baynes
Li'l Sebastian R.I.P.
Shadowfax with Gandalf
bill-pony-lotr

Celebrate Sartorial Excellence with the Most Important Clothing Items in SFF!


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Joseph-Osmond

What makes a world compelling? In fiction, piling on details about food, home decor, and clothing can be a quick way to introduce a reader to larger issues of class and gender roles. And particularly in genre literature, clothing and jewelry can be imbued with significance (and sometimes magic) that can turn the tide of a plot.

We’ve rounded up some of the most significant sartorial choices in all of science fiction and fantasy, but we wanted to start you off with that glorious image above, in which Donny Osmond’s teeth almost manage to outshine the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat itself. The original Coat of Many Colors landed Joseph in a pretty serious scrape, but it also led to adventure, an Andrew Lloyd Webber musical, and a classic Dolly Parton song. All of the clothes and accessories we’ve gathered here likewise either have great, story-altering significance, or act as catalysts to ...

The One Ring
Mickey Mouse as The Sorcerer's Apprentice
The Tale of Three Brothers
Only Lovers Left Alive
They Live
The Ruby Slippers in The Wizard of Oz
The Wardrobe in The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe