The Spring/Summer Indie Love Award


This post is by M.J. Rose from Buzz, Balls & Hype


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A special award—from authors to booksellers—to say thank you this Spring/Summer season. Spring Indie Love Logo-1We're celebrating booksellers because you make discoveries, shine light on titles that you love, and welcome readers to your stores.  Every Indie who sells a combined 25 copies (or more) from these bestselling & award-winning authors shown below receives a tin of treats from the Dancing Deer Baking Co.  And the one bookseller who sells the most copies will win a $500 American Express Gift Certificate.  To qualify to win: Simply keep track of copies sold of these six titles and email AuthorBuzzCo at gmail.com by July 1 with your tallies, using the heading “Indie Love.”  It’s just our way of taking a moment to show you some love back for all the love you show us authors.

Author Love Sheet-Spring-proof-fff

REVIEW: MASTERMIND


This post is by TEV from The Elegant Variation


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My review of Maria Konnikov's MASTERMIND: HOW TO THINK LIKE SHERLOCK HOLMES went live over at the Barnes and Noble Review while I was away for the Jerusalem International Book Fair:

"You have been in Afghanistan, I perceive" is the observation that launched a thousand films, sequels, and imitators. The first words (after "How are you?") that Holmes says upon meeting Watson in A Study in Scarlet have become the template for all that follows: A display of extraordinary, apparently superhuman deduction, seemingly arbitrary but, upon closer inspection, the result of the methodical assemblage of a handful of details. Other men see; Holmes observes. And who among his fans has not, even briefly, imagined that we, too, might observe as Holmes does?

Maria Konnikova takes this impulse and gives us hope in her first book, Mastermind: How to Think like Sherlock Holmes, although the book might be more ...

REVIEW: MASTERMIND


This post is by TEV from The Elegant Variation


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




My review of Maria Konnikov's MASTERMIND: HOW TO THINK LIKE SHERLOCK HOLMES went live over at the Barnes and Noble Review while I was away for the Jerusalem International Book Fair:

"You have been in Afghanistan, I perceive" is the observation that launched a thousand films, sequels, and imitators. The first words (after "How are you?") that Holmes says upon meeting Watson in A Study in Scarlet have become the template for all that follows: A display of extraordinary, apparently superhuman deduction, seemingly arbitrary but, upon closer inspection, the result of the methodical assemblage of a handful of details. Other men see; Holmes observes. And who among his fans has not, even briefly, imagined that we, too, might observe as Holmes does?

Maria Konnikova takes this impulse and gives us hope in her first book, Mastermind: How to Think like Sherlock Holmes, although the book might be more ...

REVIEW: MASTERMIND


This post is by TEV from The Elegant Variation


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




My review of Maria Konnikov's MASTERMIND: HOW TO THINK LIKE SHERLOCK HOLMES went live over at the Barnes and Noble Review while I was away for the Jerusalem International Book Fair:

"You have been in Afghanistan, I perceive" is the observation that launched a thousand films, sequels, and imitators. The first words (after "How are you?") that Holmes says upon meeting Watson in A Study in Scarlet have become the template for all that follows: A display of extraordinary, apparently superhuman deduction, seemingly arbitrary but, upon closer inspection, the result of the methodical assemblage of a handful of details. Other men see; Holmes observes. And who among his fans has not, even briefly, imagined that we, too, might observe as Holmes does?

Maria Konnikova takes this impulse and gives us hope in her first book, Mastermind: How to Think like Sherlock Holmes, although the book might be more ...

REVIEW: MASTERMIND


This post is by TEV from The Elegant Variation


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




My review of Maria Konnikov's MASTERMIND: HOW TO THINK LIKE SHERLOCK HOLMES went live over at the Barnes and Noble Review while I was away for the Jerusalem International Book Fair:
"You have been in Afghanistan, I perceive" is the observation that launched a thousand films, sequels, and imitators. The first words (after "How are you?") that Holmes says upon meeting Watson in A Study in Scarlet have become the template for all that follows: A display of extraordinary, apparently superhuman deduction, seemingly arbitrary but, upon closer inspection, the result of the methodical assemblage of a handful of details. Other men see; Holmes observes. And who among his fans has not, even briefly, imagined that we, too, might observe as Holmes does?

Maria Konnikova takes this impulse and gives us hope in her first book, Mastermind: How to Think like Sherlock Holmes, although the book might be more ...

Susannah Cahalan: ‘What I remember most vividly are the fear and anger’


This post is by Carole Cadwalladr from Books | The Guardian


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The New Yorker was 24 when she fell seriously ill with a mystery condition. She was lucky: a neurologist recognised the symptoms and she recovered. Here she tells how she pieced together her terrifying ordeal to write a remarkable memoir

In 2009, Susannah Cahalan was 24 years old and living the kind of New York life that young women who have watched too much Sex and the City dream about. She had the go-getting job as a news reporter on the city's tabloid New York Post. She had the musician boyfriend, the gadabout social life, even the cubbyhole apartment in a desirable part of town.

And then she had hallucinations, seizures, personality disorder, psychosis and, finally, catatonia. Not so Carrie Bradshaw, then. "My tongue twisted when I spoke; I drooled and, when I was tired, let my tongue hang out of the side of my mouth like an overheated dog....

Five authors to watch in 2013


This post is by TEV from The Elegant Variation


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Telegraph looks at five young authors to watch in 2013.  TEV favorite Sheila Heti is on the list, but I'm especially intrigued by Owen Martell's novel Intermission:

A slim, rigourously nuanced book, Intermission tells the story of how [Bill] Evans’s family try to support him in 1961 when he is devastated by the accidental death of Scott LaFaro, bass player in his celebrated trio. His protective elder brother Harry knows he is a drug addict and fears the worst.

Jazz novels are always so hard to pull off (Ondaatje's Coming Through Slaughter succeeds; Morrison's Jazz does not), but I've always been so intrigued by the Evans/LaFaro relationship.  LaFaro was a prodigy, killed obscenely young, whose influence is still felt among jazz bassists.  It sounds like a fascinating read.

Five authors to watch in 2013


This post is by TEV from The Elegant Variation


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Telegraph looks at five young authors to watch in 2013.  TEV favorite Sheila Heti is on the list, but I'm especially intrigued by Owen Martell's novel Intermission:

A slim, rigourously nuanced book, Intermission tells the story of how [Bill] Evans’s family try to support him in 1961 when he is devastated by the accidental death of Scott LaFaro, bass player in his celebrated trio. His protective elder brother Harry knows he is a drug addict and fears the worst.

Jazz novels are always so hard to pull off (Ondaatje's Coming Through Slaughter succeeds; Morrison's Jazz does not), but I've always been so intrigued by the Evans/LaFaro relationship.  LaFaro was a prodigy, killed obscenely young, whose influence is still felt among jazz bassists.  It sounds like a fascinating read.

“My parents were born old” – John Banville on parenthood & dotage


This post is by TEV from The Elegant Variation


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In a long and uncharacterstically personal essay in the Daily Mail, John Banville reflects on old age - his own and his parents':

Thinking back on the lives of one's parents and making comparisons with one's own life can be a dizzying exercise. It startles me to realise that when my father was the age I am now, past my mid-60s, he was long retired and preparing with more or less ­equanimity for his dotage.

The essay includes a remarkable photo of an eight-year-old Banville.  You can read it all here.

“My parents were born old” – John Banville on parenthood & dotage


This post is by TEV from The Elegant Variation


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In a long and uncharacterstically personal essay in the Daily Mail, John Banville reflects on old age - his own and his parents':

Thinking back on the lives of one's parents and making comparisons with one's own life can be a dizzying exercise. It startles me to realise that when my father was the age I am now, past my mid-60s, he was long retired and preparing with more or less ­equanimity for his dotage.

The essay includes a remarkable photo of an eight-year-old Banville.  You can read it all here.

Four Fictions


This post is by Mark Athitakis from Mark Athitakis' American Fiction Notes


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The feature well of this week’s issue of Washington City Paper is dedicated to fiction for the first time in a long time. I sifted through the 50-odd submissions to pick three short stories, and also invited a pro, Eugenia Kim, to contribute—happily, she took me up on the offer. Here’s a bit from my intro:

Asking people to write a story about the District is a way to unlock a city’s id, and one of the more entertaining aspects of sorting through the submissions was learning what they’ll come up with when loosed from the demands of strict accuracy. Some ran off from the city limits­—stories rambled up to Glen Burnie, Md., and over to West Virginia. Others sank into Metro trains, which—sorry, WMATA—are consistently metaphors for darkness, confusion, and fear. But many of the writers who submitted for this issue concentrated on a theme that’s become ...

Four Fictions


This post is by Mark Athitakis from Mark Athitakis' American Fiction Notes


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The feature well of this week’s issue of Washington City Paper is dedicated to fiction for the first time in a long time. I sifted through the 50-odd submissions to pick three short stories, and also invited a pro, Eugenia Kim, to contribute—happily, she took me up on the offer. Here’s a bit from my intro:

Asking people to write a story about the District is a way to unlock a city’s id, and one of the more entertaining aspects of sorting through the submissions was learning what they’ll come up with when loosed from the demands of strict accuracy. Some ran off from the city limits­—stories rambled up to Glen Burnie, Md., and over to West Virginia. Others sank into Metro trains, which—sorry, WMATA—are consistently metaphors for darkness, confusion, and fear. But many of the writers who submitted for this issue concentrated on a theme that’s become ...

Four Fictions


This post is by Mark Athitakis from Mark Athitakis' American Fiction Notes


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The feature well of this week’s issue of Washington City Paper is dedicated to fiction for the first time in a long time. I sifted through the 50-odd submissions to pick three short stories, and also invited a pro, Eugenia Kim, to contribute—happily, she took me up on the offer. Here’s a bit from my intro:

Asking people to write a story about the District is a way to unlock a city’s id, and one of the more entertaining aspects of sorting through the submissions was learning what they’ll come up with when loosed from the demands of strict accuracy. Some ran off from the city limits­—stories rambled up to Glen Burnie, Md., and over to West Virginia. Others sank into Metro trains, which—sorry, WMATA—are consistently metaphors for darkness, confusion, and fear. But many of the writers who submitted for this issue concentrated on a theme that’s become ...