The best recent crime and thrillers – review roundup


This post is by Laura Wilson from Books | The Guardian


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American Spy by Lauren Wilkinson; The Most Difficult Thing by Charlotte Philby; The Chain by Adrian McKinty; The Poison Garden by Alex Marwood; The Reunion by Guillaume Musso and The Lady in the Car With Glasses and a Gun by Sébastien Japrisot

If your idea of a cold war thriller is a “white saviour” hero with conservative values rescuing the world from the Soviet menace, think again: American Spy (Dialogue, £14.99), Lauren Wilkinson’s intelligent and pacy debut set against the background of a real coup d’état, injects new life into this tired formula. It’s 1987, and black FBI agent Marie Mitchell, her career stalled by racism and sexism, is recruited by the CIA as the bait in a honeytrap. The target is Burkina Faso’s president Thomas Sankara, and the aim is to destabilise his fledgling government, whose Marxist leanings run counter to American interests. Despite misgivings, Mitchell ...

My gonzo night at Hunter S Thompson’s cabin – now on Airbnb


This post is by Kevin EG Perry from Books | The Guardian


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Fuelled by hard drugs and righteous anger, his incendiary prose changed journalism – and America. Could our writer channel his spirit by spending a night at the typewriter where it all happened?

It is 4.30 on a Thursday morning and I am writing these words on the big red IBM Selectric III that once belonged to Hunter S Thompson. Owl Farm, Thompson’s “fortified compound” in Woody Creek, Colorado, is dark and silent outside. Even the peacocks he raised are sleeping. The only sound anywhere is the warm hum of this electric typewriter and the mechanical rhythm of its key strikes, as clear and certain as gunfire.

In April, Thompson’s widow, Anita, began renting out the writer’s cabin to help support the Hunter S Thompson scholarship for veterans at Columbia University, where both she and Hunter studied. It sits beside the main Thompson home on a 17-hectare estate marked with ...

My gonzo night at Hunter S Thompson’s cabin – now on Airbnb


This post is by Kevin EG Perry from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Fuelled by hard drugs and righteous anger, his incendiary prose changed journalism – and America. Could our writer channel his spirit by spending a night at the typewriter where it all happened?

It is 4.30 on a Thursday morning and I am writing these words on the big red IBM Selectric III that once belonged to Hunter S Thompson. Owl Farm, Thompson’s “fortified compound” in Woody Creek, Colorado, is dark and silent outside. Even the peacocks he raised are sleeping. The only sound anywhere is the warm hum of this electric typewriter and the mechanical rhythm of its key strikes, as clear and certain as gunfire.

In April, Thompson’s widow, Anita, began renting out the writer’s cabin to help support the Hunter S Thompson scholarship for veterans at Columbia University, where both she and Hunter studied. It sits beside the main Thompson home on a 17-hectare estate marked with ...

Fancy buying Philip Roth’s stereo? Auction appeals to literary fetishists


This post is by Alison Flood from Books | The Guardian


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A forthcoming sale will cash in on our attraction to anything – but anything – touched by a revered writer. Has bookish bric a brac gone too far?

Would you like to own a large straw giraffe and a “shh” sign from the Ritz Carlton, both of which used to sit in the corner of Philip Roth’s front guest bedroom? Or how about the great American novelist’s seven-piece wicker patio suite? No? Then surely you’d go for a folding ladder found in his barn, or his stereo, doorstop or Samsonite rolling suitcase (“with original luggage tag filled out by Roth”)?

Litchfield County Auctions has just listed a bewildering number and variety of items from the estate of the writer, who died last year aged 85. It turns out that we have not only the towering majesty of novels such as Portnoy’s Complaint and American Pastoral to remember ...

Game of Thrones prequel: no Targaryens or Lannisters – but plenty of Starks


This post is by Alison Flood from Books | The Guardian


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George RR Martin reveals new details of HBO’s forthcoming spin-off serial, which is set to star Naomi Watts and Miranda Richardson

George RR Martin has let slip a few details about the forthcoming Game of Thrones prequel, revealing that while there may be fewer dragons in the HBO television show, there will be direwolves, mammoths and White Walkers.

The serial, which is currently being filmed in Northern Ireland, takes places thousands of years before the events in Game of Thrones and “chronicles the world’s descent from the golden age of heroes into its darkest hour”, according to HBO. Naomi Watts is lined up to star as “a charismatic socialite hiding a dark secret”, with Miranda Richardson also part of the cast. Jane Goldman and Martin himself are the show’s creators, with Goldman the showrunner.

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‘It sickens me’: Gillian Flynn slams Gone Girl theory in missing woman case


This post is by Alison Flood from Books | The Guardian


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Lawyer for Jennifer Dulos’s husband is exploring whether her disappearance is a ‘Gone Girl-type case’, provoking fury of author behind book

Gone Girl author Gillian Flynn has said an estranged husband’s claim that his missing wife may have faked her disappearance in the manner of Flynn’s bestselling novel “absolutely sickens” her.

Connecticut woman Jennifer Dulos has not been seen since 24 May when she was collecting her children from school, according to ABC News. Police believe the mother of five was assaulted in her home, where bloodstains were found. She was in the process of what has been described as a bitter custody dispute with her husband, Fotis Dulos, whose lawyer, Norm Pattis, insists does not know where she is.

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Activist held in US after reciting poem attacking immigration rules


This post is by Alison Flood from Books | The Guardian


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American Civil Liberties Union files court petition arguing that the detention of Jose Bello violates the first amendment

A student activist who was arrested in California 36 hours after reading a poem critical of immigration policy is being supported by the American Civil Liberties Union, which is arguing that his arrest violates the first amendment.

Jose Bello read the poem, Dear America, at a public forum held by the Kern County board of supervisors in May. Written after his detention by the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency in 2018, the poem reads: “We demand our respect. We want our dignity back. / Our roots run deep in this country, now that’s a true fact … We don’t want your jobs. We don’t want your money. / We’re here to work hard, pay taxes, and study.”

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Joy Harjo is first Native American named US poet laureate


This post is by Associated Press from Books | The Guardian


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Oklahoma-born, Muscogee Creek Nation member who helped tell an ‘American story’ has been in the wings for a long time

Poet, musician, author Joy Harjo has been appointed as the new US poet laureate, the first Native American to be named to the post.

The Oklahoma-born, Muscogee Creek Nation member has been in the wings for this role for a long time.

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Nicholas Sparks sorry for ‘appearing intolerant’ of LGBT pupils at his school


This post is by Alison Flood from Books | The Guardian


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After leaks showed him banning an LGBT club at the Christian school he co-founded, the novelist apologises for any hurt caused

Romance novelist Nicholas Sparks has apologised for “potentially hurt[ing] young people and members of the LGBTQ community”, after leaked emails showed him banning students from forming an LGBT club at a school he co-founded.

The Daily Beast published emails from Sparks last week, in which the novelist criticised the headmaster of Epiphany school in North Carolina for “what some perceive as an agenda that strives to make homosexuality open and accepted”. Sparks told the former headmaster, Saul Benjamin, who launched a lawsuit against him in 2014, that his decision to stop LGBT students from forming a club was “NOT discrimination”, adding: “Remember, we’ve had gay students before, many of them … [The previous headmaster] handled it quietly and wonderfully … I expect you to do the same.”

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Nicholas Sparks sorry for ‘appearing intolerant’ of LGBT pupils at his school


This post is by Alison Flood from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




After leaks showed him banning an LGBT club at the Christian school he co-founded, the novelist apologises for any hurt caused

Romance novelist Nicholas Sparks has apologised for “potentially hurt[ing] young people and members of the LGBTQ community”, after leaked emails showed him banning students from forming an LGBT club at a school he co-founded.

The Daily Beast published emails from Sparks last week, in which the novelist criticised the headmaster of Epiphany school in North Carolina for “what some perceive as an agenda that strives to make homosexuality open and accepted”. Sparks told the former headmaster, Saul Benjamin, who launched a lawsuit against him in 2014, that his decision to stop LGBT students from forming a club was “NOT discrimination”, adding: “Remember, we’ve had gay students before, many of them … [The previous headmaster] handled it quietly and wonderfully … I expect you to do the same.”

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Nicholas Sparks defends diversity record at school after emails leak


This post is by Alison Flood from Books | The Guardian


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Author of The Notebook and school’s co-founder says emails to former headmaster are ‘not news’ ahead of trial in August

Bestselling romantic novelist Nicholas Sparks has rejected claims that he fostered an anti-LGBT environment at a school that he co-founded, after emails between him and a former headmaster were leaked to the Daily Beast.

The author of The Notebook and A Walk to Remember co-founded the Epiphany School of Global Studies in North Carolina in 2006. In 2014, former headmaster Saul Benjamin launched a lawsuit in which he alleged that Sparks and other members of the school board had “unapologetically marginalised, bullied, and harassed” people at the school, including Benjamin, “whose religious views and/or identities did not conform to their religiously driven, bigoted preconceptions”. The lawsuit also alleged that influential families at the school bullied and “sought to enact a ‘homo-caust’” against LGBT students, and claimed that Sparks “derisively” ...

Naomi Wolf faces ‘new questions’ as US publisher postpones latest book


This post is by Alison Flood from Books | The Guardian


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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt had said it would stand by Outrages after row in UK over its historical accuracy, but has now recalled copies from stores

Naomi Wolf’s US publisher has postponed the release of her new book and is recalling copies from booksellers, saying that new questions have arisen over the book’s content.

Outrages, which argues that the Obscene Publications Act of 1857 led to a turn against consensual sex between men and an increase in executions for sodomy, was published in the UK on 20 May. Wolf has already acknowledged that the book contains two errors, after an on-air challenge on BBC Radio 3 during which the writer and broadcaster Matthew Sweet told her that she had misunderstood the term “death recorded” in historical records as signifying an execution. In fact it denotes the opposite, Sweet pointed out, highlighting that a teenager she said had been “actually executed ...

Pepe the Frog creator wins $15,000 settlement against Infowars


This post is by Holly Swinyard from Books | The Guardian


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Victory is latest in a string of legal actions by Matt Furie, who is seeking to halt the co-option of his cartoon by the far right

Matt Furie, the cartoonist behind the character and online meme Pepe the Frog, has won a $15,000 (£12,000) settlement against website Infowars and its creator, the conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, over use of the anthropomorphic frog in far-right imagery.

Pepe first appeared as a character in 2005 in Furie’s comic Boy’s Club, in which the “peaceful frog-dude” and his animal housemates got up to various college hijinks. His image quickly became a meme on MySpace, and later the anonymous message board 4chan, before it was co-opted by the US “alt-right” in the early 2010s.

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Pepe the Frog creator wins $15,000 settlement against Infowars


This post is by Holly Swinyard from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Victory is latest in a string of legal actions by Matt Furie, who is seeking to halt the co-option of his cartoon by the far right

Matt Furie, the cartoonist behind the character and online meme Pepe the Frog, has won a $15,000 (£12,000) settlement against website Infowars and its creator, the conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, over use of the anthropomorphic frog in far-right imagery.

Pepe first appeared as a character in 2005 in Furie’s comic Boy’s Club, in which the “peaceful frog-dude” and his animal housemates got up to various college hijinks. His image quickly became a meme on MySpace, and later the anonymous message board 4chan, before it was co-opted by the US “alt-right” in the early 2010s.

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Pepe the Frog creator wins $15,000 settlement against Infowars


This post is by Holly Swinyard from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Victory is latest in a string of legal actions by Matt Furie, who is seeking to halt the co-option of his cartoon by the far right

Matt Furie, the cartoonist behind the character and online meme Pepe the Frog, has won a $15,000 (£12,000) settlement against website Infowars and its creator, the conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, over use of the anthropomorphic frog in far-right imagery.

Pepe first appeared as a character in 2005 in Furie’s comic Boy’s Club, in which the “peaceful frog-dude” and his animal housemates got up to various college hijinks. His image quickly became a meme on MySpace, and later the anonymous message board 4chan, before it was co-opted by the US “alt-right” in the early 2010s.

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AOC as ‘Supergirl’: comic parody hits back at DC complaint


This post is by Alison Flood from Books | The Guardian


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After cease and desist letter issued for portraying Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez like DC’s Wonder Woman, indie Devil’s Due pastiches another character

After getting into hot water with DC Comics for an issue in which congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez looked a little too much like DC’s Wonder Woman, independent publisher Devil’s Due has hit back with a replacement cover – in which “AOC” looks remarkably like Supergirl.

Devil’s Due said that it had been issued with a cease and desist letter from DC in May after it published a limited edition of its comic Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the Freshman Force, showing her in an outfit like Wonder Woman’s, holding the American flag. According to Devil’s Due, DC said the cover “violates their Wonder Woman copyright”. Comics news site Bleeding Cool reported that the letter requested the edition, which only ran to 250 copies, should “not be distributed, but recalled and returned or destroyed”.

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Stanford sexual assault survivor to publish book about her ordeal


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


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Publisher promises the as yet untitled work by ‘Emily Doe’ will reclaim her story and ‘change the way we talk about sexual assault forever’

The anonymous Californian woman who was sexually assaulted by Stanford University student Brock Turner and whose powerful victim’s statement was read by millions around the world, is writing a book about the assault and trial, and her recovery.

Publicly known only as “Emily Doe”, the then 22-year-old was unconscious when she was sexually assaulted by Turner behind a dumpster on campus in 2015. The case made headlines around the world when Turner repeatedly claimed alcohol was to blame and that the encounter was consensual, while his father called the attack “20 minutes of action”.

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Donald Trump wants the UK to ‘get rid of the shackles’ – what does that mean?


This post is by Steven Poole from Books | The Guardian


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Shackles have been strapped to prisoners’ legs for a millennium but maybe they are now our final protection from strange American imports

During his state visit this week, Donald Trump tweeted that a “big Trade Deal” would be possible once the UK “gets rid of the shackles”. He was not communicating from a cell in the Tower to negotiate the removal of his leg-irons. Shackles have been prisoners’ fetters for a millennium, but since 1200 or so they have also been any metaphorical restraint.

Our “shackles” in this case are the EU regulations that prevent the UK importing American chlorinated chicken and suchlike. In John Yeats’s 1872 book The Growth and Vicissitudes of Commerce, the author recounts the difficulties caused to domestic industry by the fact that, in the 16th century, the Hanseatic League operated its own steelworks in London as a “state within a state”. When the emperor ...

Stan Lee: three more accused of elder abuse of Marvel creator


This post is by David Barnett from Books | The Guardian


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Joan Celia Lee files lawsuit against her father’s former manager, and two others, alleging a ‘sinister plot’ to take advantage of the ailing comics legend

Stan Lee’s daughter is suing her father’s former manager and two other individuals over a “sinister plot” to take financial advantage of him and steal valuable items of memorabilia, and work the Marvel comics creator so hard he could no longer walk or talk.

The lawsuit, filed at Los Angeles superior court on Tuesday on behalf of Joan Celia Lee, levels seven charges of breach of contract, breach of fiduciary duty and elder abuse against Max Anderson, who served as Lee’s manager for his memorabilia business and personal appearances after meeting him at the San Diego Comic Con in 2006.

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Siege review: Michael Wolff’s Trump tale is Fire and Fury II – fire harder


This post is by Lloyd Green from Books | The Guardian


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The follow-up to the first tell-all is a wild ride, stretching credulity, indebted to Steve Bannon. But so is the president

Michael Wolff is back and not with a whimper. The latest installment of his Trump chronicles picks up where Fire and Fury ended. Once again, it leaves the president bruised and readers shaking their heads.

Related: Mueller drew up obstruction indictment against Trump, Michael Wolff book says

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