Rereading Frank Herbert’s Dune: Children of Dune, Part Five

Children of Dune cover, Frank Herbert

This week we’re going to get caught in a trapvine by a very old friend who we should have seen coming.

Index to the reread can be located here! And don’t forget this is a reread, which means that any and all of these posts will contain spoilers for all of Frank Herbert’s Dune series. If you’re not caught up, keep that in mind.

Summary

(Through “You will learn the integrated communication methods as you complete the next step in your mental education.”)

Jessica and Duncan have arrived on Selusa Secundus, and word has spread that Leto is dead and Alia has agreed to submit to a Trial of Possession, though many (including Farad’n) do not know what that means. No date has been set for the trial, which leads meany to believe it will never occur. A civil war has broken out on Arrakis between the desert Fremen ...

Star Trek: Discovery Should Recommit to the Idea of “Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations”

“Infinite diversity in infinite combinations.” That is one of Star Trek’s most prominent mottos (even if it was ultimately created out of a desire to sell merchandise). That is what the spirit of Trek is meant to embody. The wonder of the universe wrapped up in a statement of inspiration and acceptance, a promise to pursue that which we do not understand; to embrace it with optimism and open minds.

They are captivating words that Star Trek has worked hard to advocate, with varying results. But if Trek intends to be relevant long into the 21st century, those words could use re-examination. In this day and age, how can Star Trek renew its commitment to infinite diversity? What should this bright, shining future look like, fifty years after its inception?

Star Trek been held up as an example to aspire towards since its creation. The performers, writers, producers, ...

Star Trek, DS9, Dax
Star Trek, TNG, Geordi
Star Trek, Chekov and Uhura
Star Trek, DS9, Bajoran Vedeks
Star Trek, TOS crew, I Mudd

5 Things Albus Dumbledore Should Have Told Harry Potter for the Sake of Basic Human Decency

Dumbledore and Harry

The world is full wise old men who will tell you all the important bits of information that you need to complete your world-saving quest… if you live in a fictional epic about that sort of thing. Problem is, these wise old men never tell you the whole story, do they? They give you half. Or a quarter. They tell you the truth, but they reframe it like it’s an old story, or a play that they saw at this really good theatre once. They teach you lessons like they are doling out candy—too good to eat all at once.

But surely that can’t always be true.

Albus Dumbledore kept a lot of things from Harry Potter throughout his years at Hogwarts, and even after his death. But the hardest part about these secrets is that they were often revealed strategically, or Harry had to find them out for himself ...

Harry Potter, Deathly Hallows, part 2
Snape and Lily
Dumbledore and Grindelwald
Draco, Half-Blood Prince
Albus Dumbledore, Pride flag

I’m Tired of Hollywood’s “Wait and See” Attitude Towards On-Screen Queerness

Beauty and the Beast, Le Fou The wheels of progress are slow and aggravatingly risk-averse. The growth of Queer representation in mainstream media has been sluggish as molasses for the past couple of decades, despite the progress made. Stereotypes abound and the roles are slim pickings overall, especially where blockbuster films are concerned—a proverbial no man’s land where the mere idea of a queer personage seems like a dream to many fans. But there’s a new trend in Hollywood that makes this all the more irritating; the plea for fans to ‘wait and see!’ what scraps of representation they can expect from beloved stories. There have been wink’n’nudge gay characters slotted into films and television since the inception of both mediums, so it’s no surprise that the trend continues. With the Hays Code in place from the 1930s to the 1960s (which prevented the depiction of homosexuality unless it was portrayed as evil or laughable, ...
Basic Instinct, Sharon Stone
How to Train Your Dragon 2, Gobber the Belch
Star Wars, Force Awakens, Poe and Finn
Beauty and the Beast, Le Fou
Guardian of the Galaxy, Vol. 2, Ravagers
Guardian of the Galaxy, Vol. 2, Yondu and Rocket
Marvel One-Shot: All Hail the King, Justin Hammer

I’m Tired of Hollywood’s “Wait and See” Attitude Towards On-Screen Queerness

Beauty and the Beast, Le Fou The wheels of progress are slow and aggravatingly risk-averse. The growth of Queer representation in mainstream media has been sluggish as molasses for the past couple of decades, despite the progress made. Stereotypes abound and the roles are slim pickings overall, especially where blockbuster films are concerned—a proverbial no man’s land where the mere idea of a queer personage seems like a dream to many fans. But there’s a new trend in Hollywood that makes this all the more irritating; the plea for fans to ‘wait and see!’ what scraps of representation they can expect from beloved stories. There have been wink’n’nudge gay characters slotted into films and television since the inception of both mediums, so it’s no surprise that the trend continues. With the Hays Code in place from the 1930s to the 1960s (which prevented the depiction of homosexuality unless it was portrayed as evil or laughable, ...
Basic Instinct, Sharon Stone
How to Train Your Dragon 2, Gobber the Belch
Star Wars, Force Awakens, Poe and Finn
Beauty and the Beast, Le Fou
Guardian of the Galaxy, Vol. 2, Ravagers
Guardian of the Galaxy, Vol. 2, Yondu and Rocket
Marvel One-Shot: All Hail the King, Justin Hammer

Rereading Frank Herbert’s Dune: Children of Dune, Part Four

Children of Dune cover, Frank Herbert

< p class="p1">This week we’re going to get attacked by tigers! Two of them. Big tigers. And one of us won’t make it out alive… or will they? (That is actually a legitimate question in this context, you’ll see.)

Index to the reread can be located here! And don’t forget this is a reread, which means that any and all of these posts will contain spoilers for all of Frank Herbert’s Dune series. If you’re not caught up, keep that in mind.

Summary (through “In all major socializing forces you will find an underlying movement to gain or maintain power through the use of words.”)

Jessica is giving court rulings with Alia, and is allowed to make the first judgement, sending a troubadour with a stinging tongue to House Corrino as he requested. Then al-Fali, a Fedaykin, comes before the court to ask about the desert and in a sudden ...

A Very Happy Birthday to J. K. Rowling… Whose Real Life is More Incredible Than Any Fiction

J.K. Rowling There’s an odd fairy tale out there in the world that is one of my favorites. Almost everyone knows it, or has heard some version of it. But it doesn’t have any of the usual trappings of a fairy tale; it’s not about fairies or princesses or far off places. It doesn’t contain any magical artifacts or wishes gone wrong or strange trips into the woods to discover the real dangers of the world. It’s the story of a woman who needed to write books of magic. Or… books about magic, anyway. It is awfully hard to tell the two apart when you get right down to it. You know what else is awfully hard? Talking about J. K. Rowling objectively, in a scholarly manner, as one feels sometimes obligated to do (and on her birthday, too!). And it’s not just because she wrote one of the most successful book series ...