Watch the Trailer for Supernatural’s Final Season


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The final season of Supernatural is almost here.

The CW dropped a trailer on Friday the 13th, giving a sneak peak at what’s to come in the 15th season of the demon-hunting brothers’ journey. It seems that every soul that was vanquished to hell has come back, and now the Winchester bros must face off against old enemies…

The trailer definitely feels like a callback to earlier seasons, with Sam and Dean kicking butt and crossing out names on their demon-hunted list.

Watch the trailer below:

via [The CW]

An Introduction to the Worlds of The Witcher


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A warrior roaming the lands has gained notoriety among the commonfolk. Word of his deeds has spread far, and his approach strikes fear at the heart of the most formidable opponent. Known as the “Butcher of Blaviken” or the “White Wolf,” Geralt of Rivia’s reputation as a killer of men and monsters has earned him appreciation and disdain in equal measure. Better known by his famed moniker The Witcher, Geralt goes where no man dares. He answers bounties and notices posted by the citizens of the continent, calls for aid in ridding their towns of haunting menaces or in breaking curses that trouble the innocent: blood for coin. And in his mastery of the sword— rumours telling of a steel blade for men, a silver blade for non-humans—he is almost unrivaled.

Geralt hails from Kaer Morhen, a once-formidable fortress that in ages past served as a witchers’ settlement. It ...

Watch the Latest Trailer for HBO’s Watchmen Series


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Watchmen HBO series

HBO just dropped a new trailer for its upcoming reimagining-or-perhaps-sequel series to Alan Moore’s classic graphic novel Watchmen, which is set to debut on October 20.

It’s hard to pin down exactly what this series will be about. It’s described by HBO as a “modern day reimagining” of the original story. Earlier trailers have shown off police officers on the job wearing masks, who are contending with a new group of masked vigilantes that seem to be inspired by Rorschach.

Then again, previous trailers have given us glimpses of the modern day that seem to imply that the events of the original Watchmen graphic novel actually did occur, solidifying the faithless and consolidated U.S. that we see in the trailers for the show. (President-For-Life Robert Redford, anyone?)

As we see in this latest trailer, this latest series takes place in Tulsa, Oklahoma and chronicles a series of ...

Entertainment Weekly Reveals 8 New Details About HBO’s His Dark Materials


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His Dark Materials HBO BBC trailer adaptation

HBO unveiled the release date (November 4th!) for its upcoming fantasy series His Dark Materials earlier this week, and today, Entertainment Weekly has some additional details about the upcoming adaptation of Philip Pullman’s classic series.

For those unfamiliar: the series is set in an alternate Earth where peoples’ souls manifest as shape-shifting animals (known as “daemons”). The first novel, The Golden Compass, followed a young girl named Lyra, who began searching for a kidnapped friend, and stumbled into a horrific plot hatched by her world’s domineering Church. Last September, HBO and BBC studios announced that they had renewed the series for a second season.

EW‘s article takes a closer look at the upcoming first season, and provides some new details about what to expect. Here’s what we learned from it:

  • The series will move quickly. Each episode takes place in a different location, following Lyra from Oxford ...

The Good Place Has Television’s Most Divine Will They/Won’t They


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I admit this to you, dear readers, on the privacy of the internet: I am that person who did not want Scully and Mulder to get together. (Although, for what it’s worth, I am also that person who did want Will and Hannibal to get together.) When I was very smol, and watched Cheers, I loved Will They/Won’t They. But pretty much every subsequent iteration has left me cold. Things I hate: when a sitcom becomes about the tension between two people, because I don’t think that’s enough of an engine for an ensemble show; that until very recently the trope has been relentlessly heteronormative; the way Will They/Won’t They makes romantic love the prime motivator and ultimate focus of life; that it sexualizes everything in an already extremely sexed-up television world. But most of all, I hate the way this tension has ruined a lot of great ...

Watch the First Trailer for See, Apple’s Upcoming Jason Momoa Show


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Image: Apple

During its iPhone 11 announcement event today, Apple unveiled a new trailer for one of its upcoming shows, See, which stars Aquaman star Jason Momoa as the leader of a tribe living in a post-apocalyptic world where everyone has lost their vision.

Momoa plays Baba Voss, the leader of a small community in the midst of the wilderness, centuries after a virus killed off much of humanity and left the survivors blind.

As we see in the trailer, things change when a pair of infants are born who can now see, bringing some hope to the world. However, the children are put into danger when a queen orders her followers to kidnap the children, believing that “the evil of light once almost destroyed the world.” It’s up to Baba Voss to keep them safe. The trailer provides some sweeping visuals of the post apocalyptic world, showing off ancient ...

Sony TV Has Optioned Charlie Jane Anders’ The City in the Middle of the Night


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Charlie Jane Anders’ novel The City in the Middle of the Night might soon come to a television (or other screen) near you: Deadline is reporting that Sony Pictures Television has optioned the novel to develop it into a TV series.

Anders’s book published earlier this year with Tor Books. It’s set on a distant, tidally-locked world called January, with two cities on either side: the freewheeling Argelo, and Xiosphant, which is strictly regimented. A student named Sophie is exiled by Xiosphant’s oppressive government, and is rescued by the planet’s native inhabitants, the Gelet. They want to try and connect with humanity, and she might be the perfect person to help them bridge the gap between civilizations.

Sony will produce the show along with Mom de Guerre Productions and Sharon Hall, an executive producer for another notable science fiction series, The Expanse. An option on the series doesn’t automatically mean ...

Doctor Who, Star Wars, Alien … why do we love novelisations?


This post is by David Barnett from Books | The Guardian


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As a child in the lost age before video on demand, these screen-to-book stories drew me further into sci-fi – as well as many authors working today

The death this week of Terrance Dicks, the prolific Dr Who writer who penned more than 60 novels extending the TV Time Lord’s adventures, made me realise something: I love novelisations.

The appeal of my stack of those old slim Target paperbacks, written by the likes of Dicks, Malcolm Hulke and others, was obvious in my childhood, growing up as I did at the tail end of the Jon Pertwee years. Tom Baker was “my” Doctor, so the chances of ever seeing the old William Hartnell or Patrick Troughton adventures were absolutely zero. In the days before endless repeats and on-demand viewing, paperbacks were the only way I could experience those stories.

Continue reading...

The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance Could Save Us From the Homogeny of Modern Cinema


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Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance

When The Dark Crystal first premiered in 1982, it fueled the dreams and nightmares of many children, but it also represented a dream of Muppets-creator, Jim Henson—to bring puppetry into new and darker creative realms, recognized as an art form that could be used in complex storytelling. While The Dark Crystal was a modest box office success, 1986’s Labyrinth didn’t recoup its budget, and Henson’s death in 1990 slowed the company’s forays into projects of such scale. The Jim Henson Creature Shop continues to do exemplary work in its creation of puppets for film and television, but productions that truly rely solely on puppetry for visual effects remain few and far between.

Given the state of things, The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance is perfectly poised to remind us all of what we’re missing.

Though it receives cult classic status by many metrics, The Dark Crystal suffered as a film ...

Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance

Why You Should Be Watching The Terror, Series 1


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On August 29, 2019, Parks Canada released a stunning video of the interior of one of Sir John Franklin’s lost ships, HMS Terror. In the first detailed exploration since the wreck was rediscovered in 2016, archaeologists sent a remote drone to explore the wreck and found a stunningly well-preserved ship—“frozen in time” as the inevitable phrase goes—that almost looks as if the crew simply walked quietly away one day. There are plates still on the shelves; a chamber-pot remains on the floor of an officer’s cabin; and Captain Francis Crozier’s desk and chair stand upright under a soft coat of ocean sediment.

This was obviously big news for history nerds and aficionados of the Royal Navy Discovery Service’s misadventures, but it was also big news for fans of AMC’s The Terror. When The Terror Series 1 premiered in 2018, it passed under the radar for many, but over the last ...

Carnival Row Is a Surprisingly Complex Take on Victorian Fantasy Tropes, Race, and Politics


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I study Victorian Gothic fiction and am an avid fantasy aficionado, so when Amazon Studios announced Carnival Row, a Victorian-adjacent fantasy series, I fully expected that I would either love or hate it. Now, having binged the eight episodes of the first season (it was renewed for season 2 before it aired), I can say that, much to my surprise, my personal reaction is closer to the former than the latter. It’s a pretty good show and—if it is not necessarily the successor to Penny Dreadful, my favorite series of all time and the crowning jewel of Victorian prestige TV—it is definitely a thoughtful entry that, unlike a lot of media that uses 19th century England as inspiration, is very concerned with the content as well as the look of the Victorian world. Carnival Row is, in essence, a show interested in using both the tropes of ...

Head Back to School in These 4 Anime + Book Pairings


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As a long-time fan of both speculative fiction and anime, one common thread I’ve noticed in both media is the enduring presence of The School Story. Plenty of fantasy readers make their grand entrance to the genre via a school fantasy story; for teens, who spend more time at school than at home, what other setting could tie the fantastic world to mundane reality?

Here are four anime to watch based on the book series you love—or, if you came here looking for books, four book series to read based on your favorite anime!

 

Read Harry Potter, Watch Little Witch Academia

Screencap: TOHO Animation

The Harry Potter series doesn’t need much introduction, but I’ll give you a reminder anyway: in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone), a young orphan is whisked away from an abusive home in mundane 1990s Britain ...

Cult Anime FLCL Shows Its Darker Side in “Marquis de Carabas”


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The greatest trick the devil ever pulled was to convince anime fans that the direct-to-video series FLCL (aka Fooly Cooly) was a comedy. Oh sure, it’s got all the trappings: vivid, eccentric characters; fast-paced, hyperbolic animation; and a robot with a severe case of diarrhea. But look past the toilet gags, satirical references, and occasional bits of fanservice, and it isn’t hard to discover a darkness that subsumes the series.

And if you have any questions about how far down into the depths a series can descend while maintaining its clownish façade, all you need do is look at FLCL’s third episode, “Maru Raba,” otherwise known as “Marquis de Carabas.”

There’s a stoic, young girl sitting in the back seat of a car, being driven to school by her father’s secretary. The girl is Ninamori, child of privilege and influence and, as class president, of no ...

The Flash Gordon Serials of the 1930s Changed the Face of Sci-Fi


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One of the first things I watched when I signed up for Netflix was a suspense serial from the silent film era called Phantomas, and while it was very enlightening to see this first step in the evolution of recorded crime dramas, ultimately it… wasn’t very good. Maybe that’s not fair—it had its moments, but I would have a hard time recommending it to anyone but the most curious film archivists.

Thanks to the growth of streaming services, a vast archive of antique entertainment is now easily accessible to the public, though whether it should be or not is a matter of personal opinion. In the case of the Flash Gordon serials that Universal created from 1936 to 1940, the debate over such material’s worth is a significant matter to science fiction fans. The serials, starring Larry “Buster” Crabbe as Flash (a character who had first appeared in newspaper ...

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Rewatch Extra: What We Left Behind


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We hereby present this review of the documentary What We Left Behind in the same format as “The Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Rewatch” by the same author that ran on this site from 2013-2015, and a similar format to the current “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Reread” of the post-finale DS9 fiction.

What We Left Behind: Looking Back at Deep Space Nine
Directed by Ira Steven Behr
Original release date: May 13, 2019
Stardate: n/a

Station log. Ira Steven Behr, the show-runner of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine for most of its run, gets together a massive number of people involved with the show to talk about it on the occasion of the show’s conclusion happening twenty years ago.

The documentary is bookended with guys in tuxedos singing, none of whom are James Darren (Vic Fontaine). We start with Max Grodénchik (Rom) singing a song ...