Philip Pullman’s La Belle Sauvage to be adapted for London stage


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Nicholas Hytner will direct an adaptation of the His Dark Materials prequel at the Bridge theatre

More than a decade after Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy first dazzled theatre audiences, his prequel novel La Belle Sauvage is set to be adapted for the stage at London’s Bridge theatre in autumn 2020.

On Friday, a spokesperson for the Bridge theatre confirmed that plans were under way to adapt Pullman’s 2017 novel for the stage. Bridge artistic director Nicholas Hytner will direct the show, which will be written by Bryony Lavery.

Continue reading...

Tade Thompson’s ‘gritty’ alien invasion tale wins Arthur C Clarke award


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Judges praise winning novel Rosewater for its ‘winning combination of science fictional invention and sly wit’

British Yoruba author Tade Thompson has won the Arthur C Clarke award, the UK’s most prestigious prize for science fiction novels, for Rosewater, his alien invasion novel set in a future Africa.

Opening in 2066, in the aftermath of an alien invasion that has left much of humanity powerless through airborne microscopic fungal spores, Rosewater is the name of a new town that forms on the outskirts of an alien biodome dropped in rural Nigeria. The dome opens just once a year, heals all nearby sick people, gives new life to the dead and begins to influence people in unusual ways. The alien presence has also awakened telepathic skills among select humans, dubbed “sensitives”, and the novel follows one, Kaaro, who investigates when other sensitives begin to die.

Continue reading...

Tade Thompson’s ‘gritty’ alien invasion tale wins Arthur C Clarke award


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Judges praise winning novel Rosewater for its ‘winning combination of science fictional invention and sly wit’

British Yoruba author Tade Thompson has won the Arthur C Clarke award, the UK’s most prestigious prize for science fiction novels, for Rosewater, his alien invasion novel set in a future Africa.

Opening in 2066, in the aftermath of an alien invasion that has left much of humanity powerless through airborne microscopic fungal spores, Rosewater is the name of a new town that forms on the outskirts of an alien biodome dropped in rural Nigeria. The dome opens just once a year, heals all nearby sick people, gives new life to the dead and begins to influence people in unusual ways. The alien presence has also awakened telepathic skills among select humans, dubbed “sensitives”, and the novel follows one, Kaaro, who investigates when other sensitives begin to die.

Continue reading...

Turkish translation of Paulo Coelho ‘removed mention of Kurdistan’


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Publisher and translator express shock that version of Eleven Minutes published in Turkey had reference cut

A Turkish publishing house is pulling its translation of the Brazilian author Paulo Coelho’s Eleven Minutes after readers discovered that the translation had removed a reference to Kurdistan and changed it to the Middle East.

In the English translation of the original Portuguese, Coelho writes: “She went into an internet cafe and discovered that the Kurds came from Kurdistan, a nonexistent country, now divided between Turkey and Iraq.” The Turkish translation changes the second part of the sentence to “it was written on the internet that the Kurds lived in the Middle East.”

Continue reading...

True crime author’s claims to have interviewed serial killers contested


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Mind Games by Paul Harrison withdrawn from sale, after his accounts of interviews with Ted Bundy, Peter Sutcliffe and others were called into question

Publishers of a true crime book by an “experienced criminal profiler” have pulled his work from sale, after his claims to have interviewed serial killers including Ted Bundy and Peter Sutcliffe were called into question.

Described as “the master of the true crime genre” by Martina Cole, Paul Harrison is the author of more than 33 books, including his latest, Mind Games, issued by Urbane Publications in October 2018. The Doncaster author says he worked as a police officer in the UK for three decades, “serving as a dog handler, intelligence officer, as a detective and later as a profiler”, and that he “worked closely” with the FBI’s Behavioural Science Unit in Quantico, Virginia for six months in 1982.

Continue reading...

‘I had to be manic’: Tara June Winch on her unmissable new novel – and surviving Andrew Bolt


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The fourth title in Guardian Australia’s Unmissables series is The Yield, the Wiradjuri author’s long-awaited second novel – the writing of which almost destroyed her

In 2009 the Australian conservative commentator Andrew Bolt wrote an article for the Herald Sun under the headline: “It’s so hip to be black.”

In it he named several prominent Indigenous figures who he felt had used their heritage to qualify for roles he believed they did not deserve because of their fair skin. One of them was Tara June Winch, who was then – in the words of Bolt – “just 26 and has written only one book, Swallow the Air”. He complained that she had been named an ambassador for the Australia Council’s Indigenous literacy project – which didn’t exist. “Yes, indeed,” Bolt wrote, “because despite her auburn hair and charmingly freckled face, she, too, is an Aborigine, who claims her ‘country ...

‘I had to be manic’: Tara June Winch on her unmissable new novel – and surviving Andrew Bolt


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The fourth title in Guardian Australia’s Unmissables series is The Yield, the Wiradjuri author’s long-awaited second novel – the writing of which almost destroyed her

In 2009 the Australian conservative commentator Andrew Bolt wrote an article for the Herald Sun under the headline: “It’s so hip to be black.”

In it he named several prominent Indigenous figures who he felt had used their heritage to qualify for roles he believed they did not deserve because of their fair skin. One of them was Tara June Winch, who was then – in the words of Bolt – “just 26 and has written only one book, Swallow the Air”. He complained that she had been named an ambassador for the Australia Council’s Indigenous literacy project – which didn’t exist. “Yes, indeed,” Bolt wrote, “because despite her auburn hair and charmingly freckled face, she, too, is an Aborigine, who claims her ‘country ...

Essex drops library closure plans following sustained public protests


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




After campaign involving thousands of residents as well as stars including David Walliams and Jacqueline Wilson, council says all branches will remain open

After months of protests involving hundreds of residents and the support of big names including David Walliams and Jacqueline Wilson, Essex county council has dropped plans to close 25 libraries.

The cuts, first proposed by the Conservative council in November 2018, involved closing 25 of the county’s 74 branch libraries, as well as handing a further 19 to volunteers and 15 to run in partnership schemes.

Continue reading...

The Sandman, Catch-22, Cloud Atlas … is there such thing as an ‘unfilmable’ book?


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Books by authors like Neil Gaiman and Gabriel García Márquez have been dismissed as too difficult to adapt. With Netflix offering both time and cash, is that true anymore?

It’s remarkable how many “unfilmable” books have been, well, filmed. With this week’s news that Neil Gaiman’s sprawling comic-book series The Sandman has been acquired by Netflix, fans have been excited, if tentative, no doubt remembering the long history of attempts to adapt the 75-issue story that was often dismissed as too difficult to get on screen.

As Gaiman once said: “I’d rather see no Sandman movie made than a bad Sandman movie.” Multiple scripts were written throughout the 1990s, there was a TV show in 2010, a film in 2013, an attempted rewrite of that film in 2016 – but none of this means that Netflix’s latest literary project is doomed to fail.

Continue reading...

How to make salad dressing in prison: the hit survival guide written by an inmate


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Is tinned fish currency? How do you make ‘jail velcro’? And will bedwetting get you a single cell? Meet Carl Cattermole, whose banged-up bible is making him a hero to prisoners

When Carl Cattermole was released from prison, after serving a year of a two-and-a-half-year sentence for criminal damage, he was “confused and angry, but ready to turn everything I’d seen into a positive”. What he’d seen, inside London’s HMP Wormwood Scrubs and HMP Pentonville, was eye-opening. Prison was not the bloodbath that Hollywood had promised, nor the “Butlins for murderers and paedophiles” that the tabloid press had raged about. But it wasn’t as rehabilitative as earnest politicians had promised either. Instead, Cattermole found a system that was simultaneously underfunded and hugely expensive, that prioritised punishment over reform, and often doled this out through instances of banal cruelty – bad food, bad bureaucracy and incentive systems that pitted prisoners against ...

Guardian Books desk: ‘You can tell a lot about a country by how it treats its libraries’


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The books site editor on the challenges facing publishers, and who she would invite to her dream dinner party

How long have you had this job? What route did you take to get here?

I came to the Guardian’s books desk in a rather roundabout way. I studied journalism and international relations in Australia, my homeland, then began working as a radio producer for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. But reading has always been my most beloved pastime, so I simultaneously worked as a bookseller for four years. When I moved to the UK, I initially found it very hard to get into the media. It felt as though there were still a lot of closed doors for people taking less conventional paths. I began working as a bookseller again while I hunted for work, writing for free after hours and on days off, and using my holidays to do ...

Stanford sexual assault survivor to publish book about her ordeal


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Publisher promises the as yet untitled work by ‘Emily Doe’ will reclaim her story and ‘change the way we talk about sexual assault forever’

The anonymous Californian woman who was sexually assaulted by Stanford University student Brock Turner and whose powerful victim’s statement was read by millions around the world, is writing a book about the assault and trial, and her recovery.

Publicly known only as “Emily Doe”, the then 22-year-old was unconscious when she was sexually assaulted by Turner behind a dumpster on campus in 2015. The case made headlines around the world when Turner repeatedly claimed alcohol was to blame and that the encounter was consensual, while his father called the attack “20 minutes of action”.

Continue reading...

Elif Shafak: Turkish novelist calls for support as writers face crackdown


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Author speaks out as the regime’s prosecutors ask to examine her novels

A leading Turkish novelist Elif Shafak on Saturday urged the international community to show support for the country’s authors, journalists and academics, and warned that all traces of democracy were being crushed there.

“Turkey today is the world’s leading jailer of journalists,” she told the Hay Festival. “It’s also very tough for academics. Thousands of people have lost their jobs just for signing a peace petition.”

Continue reading...

Brexit too complicated for referendum, says Jared Diamond


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Why did Britain not look to other countries for examples of best practice, asks expert

Brexit was too complex to be decided by referendum and should have been left in the hands of elected representatives, not voters, the leading US historian Jared Diamond has said.

Speaking at the Hay festival on Saturday about his latest book, Upheaval, an analysis of world crises, Diamond said both individuals and nations could solve crises by “having a model of someone or a country who had a similar problem and solved it successfully”.

Continue reading...

James Bond still a strong ‘recruitment sergeant’ for MI6, says expert


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Dr Rory Cormac tells Hay festival Bond still loved by MI6 despite bearing no resemblance to a real spy

James Bond remains a powerful recruitment tool for MI6, a secret intelligence expert says – despite claims that he is unrealistically posh and violent.

Dr Rory Cormac, associate professor of international relations with a specialty in secret intelligence at Nottingham university, said MI6 loved the positive brand provided by Ian Fleming’s fictional spy.

Continue reading...

‘I’m such a big fan of the menstrual cycle!’ – the women asking whether it’s possible to have a better period


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Exhausted with doctors not taking periods seriously, a new wave of authors is asking whether menstruation can ever be tolerable – even enjoyable

A tiny drop of blood on our bathroom floor was what gave me away. My mother took it as a sign that, at the age of 15, my period had arrived. After popping out to the shops, she came to my room with sanitary pads and a bunch of flowers; the pads came with a brief lesson on how to use them while the gerberas were left behind without explanation, some unspoken symbolism for my blossoming womanhood.

The truth was, I had had my period for two years. It had arrived without fanfare when I was 13, but, in that short time, I had absorbed so many myths – that I would smell; that sharks would attack me if I swam in the ocean (I grew up ...

Jacob Rees-Mogg’s Victorians has sold 734 copies – will publishers take note?


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The arch-Brexiter’s tome has sales to match its awful reviews, but he’s not the first politician who’s struggled to flog a book

Let’s play a game: is this from a review of Conservative MP and arch Brexiter Jacob Rees-Mogg’s book The Victorians, or not? “Morally repellent”, “abysmal” and “soul-destroying”, “reads like it was written by a baboon”, “too pompous and too cliche-ridden”, and “a boring tome” full of “little more than commonplace cliches”. Answer: all but the last. That was Benito Mussolini’s zinger about Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf. Who knew he had it in him?

After the nation’s historians eviscerated Rees-Mogg’s 500-odd pages of pompous jingoism, it seems that the public were not even curious: The Victorians sold a dismal 734 copies in its opening week to reach the lofty heights of 379th spot on Nielsen’s UK book charts. Half of those were sold in the Midlands (15%) and London ...

Police cuts could see rise in miscarriages of justice, says forensic expert


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Angela Gallop at Hay festival says forensic testing has become commoditised due to austerity

Austerity cuts in the police force could lead to an increase in miscarriages of justice, a leading forensic scientist has warned, as constraints on funding lead to in-house forensic teams performing more selective tests.

Speaking at the Hay festival, Angela Gallop, who worked on cases including Stephen Lawrence, the Cardiff Three, the Yorkshire Ripper and James Bulger, said she feared there could be a rise due to cognitive bias in the police force, as they were both investigating criminals and performing forensic tests themselves, instead of employing third parties.

Continue reading...

Disrupted sleep patterns can lead to ‘deviant behaviour’, research suggests


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Science journalist Linda Geddes calls for more flexi-working to fit in with early risers and night owls

Finally, workers have a new excuse for stealing pens from the office or using someone else’s milk: early risers and night owls are more likely to display “unethical and deviant” behaviour if forced to work outside their natural rhythms, and should be able to set their own hours accordingly.

Speaking at the Hay festival on Monday about light and circadian rhythms, science journalist and author Linda Geddes called for more workplaces to introduce “flexi-working” to accommodate different chronotypes, which are most often split into two groups: larks, who peak in energy and mood in the mornings, and owls, who perform best later in the day.

Continue reading...

Novelist Pat Barker hits out at ‘fashionable’ diversity schemes


This post is by Sian Cain from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Prize-winning author says she distrusts post-Brexit interest in regional and working-class voices

The Man Booker prize-winning author Pat Barker says she “distrusts” London publishing’s recent burst in diversity initiatives, calling the rise in interest in regional and working-class voices a “fashionable” move motivated by fear after the Brexit referendum.

Speaking at the Hay festival on Sunday, the Durham author said she had observed an increased appetite for authors based outside London, or from working-class and minority ethnic backgrounds, over the last three years.

Continue reading...