HBO’s Watchmen Just Dropped Another Trailer at Comic-Con 2019


This post is by Stubby the Rocket from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Who watches the Watchmen? San Diego watches the Watchmen! On Saturday, HBO dropped a surprise Comic-Con trailer for Damon Lindelof’s upcoming adaptation of Watchmen, and it contains all sorts of clues and winks at the series’ plot.

The three-minute clip opens with a stick-up at a convenience store by a bunch of newscap-wearing, old-timey-looking robbers. Their efforts are thwarted almost immediately, though, by Hooded Justice, a minor character in Alan Moore’s Watchmen whose costume takes after a medieval executioner. We then cut to a familiar-looking face sitting on his couch and slurping his signature unmicrowaved beans straight from the can. If this is Rorschach, though, he’s changed his face: in this version, he’s wearing a mask made out of some metallic mercury-looking fabric.

That’s just the first sign this isn’t the Watchmen we know, and indeed, Lindelof’s version is a sequel to the original that takes place in our ...

3 New Captain Pike, Number One and Spock Short Treks Are Coming This Year


This post is by Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




It looks like Trekkies who wanted a spin-off  Star Trek series featuring Captain Pike, Spock and Number will get their wish. Sort of. A total of three new mini-episodes of Short Treks will focus on Captain Pike, Spock and Number One.

The news broke on Saturday at San Diego Comic-Con during the Star Trek: Universe panel and Alex Kurtzman even teased that a spin-off series focused on the USS Enterprise with Anson Mount, Ethan Peck and TK could happen. Saying “Do you want Captain Pike, Spock and Number One getting their own show?” The crow freaked out in the affirmative.

In addition to the classic-era Short Treks, other ...

Star Trek: Discovery Season 3 Adds Supergirl and Doctor Who Star Actor David Ajala to the Cast


This post is by Ryan Britt from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The first bit of Star Trek news out of San Diego Comic-Con 2019 just beamed in ahead of schedule. It looks like at least one new face has been confirmed for season 3 of Star Trek: Discovery, and if you’re a fan of the CW’s Supergirl, this should make you very happy.

On Saturday, just before the Star Trek Universe panel began in Hall H of San Diego Comic-Con, fansite TrekCore broke the news that actor David Ajala will join the cast of Star Trek Discovery season 3.  This was then confirmed right away at the start of the panel. Ajala said the name of his character is “Book.” According to Ajala, the character will “break the rules” a little bit.

🖖

Colm Tóibín: ‘A book wouldn’t improve Trump’


This post is by Lisa O’Kelly from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The author of Brooklyn and The Master discusses fathers and families, the new wave of female Irish novelists – and the only time he wishes he owned a TV

Colm Tóibín is an award-winning Irish writer of fiction, nonfiction and poetry. He is also a professor of the humanities at Columbia University, New York. He was born in Enniscorthy, Co Wexford, the setting for several of his books, and educated at University College Dublin. His novels include The Master, Nora Webster and The House of Names. The film adaptation of Brooklyn, about a young Irish emigrant to New York, earned three Oscar nominations in 2015. His latest book, Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know: The Fathers of Wilde, Yeats and Joyce, is published by Penguin this week.

When did you get the idea to write a book about the fathers of Joyce, Yeats and Wilde?
It began ...

Book clinic: which fiction best depicts therapy and therapists?


This post is by Bijal Shah from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The counsellor and author Bijal Shah recommends novels from the psychiatrist’s chair and beyond

Q: I’m studying to become a therapist. What are the best depictions of therapists and therapy in fiction?
Georgia Smith, 43, North Carolina, US

A: Bijal Shah, a counsellor, ‘book therapist’, author and poet, writes:
Fiction offers thoughtful insight into the conscientious work of therapists. Using the full breadth and depth of the creative licence, client cases are examined in blistering detail. The book that jumps to mind is Irvin D Yalom’s When Nietzsche Wept. A perennial literary guide for both therapists and therapists-in-training, it marries philosophy and psychoanalysis. Modern psychoanalysis founder, Joseph Breuer, attempts to treat the influential philosopher, Nietzsche, who is on the brink of suicide. Breuer, himself, is recovering from a broken heart. They form a therapeutic alliance, each attempting to heal the other’s depression. Yalom’s other notable novels with protagonist therapists, ...

My new novel allowed me to grieve years after losing my baby boy


This post is by Clare Mackintosh from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In 2006 the writer Clare Mackintosh gave birth to twin boys 12 weeks prematurely. At first everything went well, but then one twin picked up a dangerous infection, and mother and father were faced with a terrible decision

Authors are told to write what they know, but my own story was, for many years, too hard to even contemplate. I was too scared to explore the emotions I kept locked away. I wrote other books instead – became known for twisty thrillers – then last year I sat at my desk with new resolve. It was time.

In November 2006 I delivered twin boys 12 weeks prematurely. Josh and Alex were baby birds, with screwed-shut eyes and translucent skin. They drank my milk through a narrow tube, breathed via a mask over their tiny faces, and day by day grew stronger.

Continue reading...

Happy Birthday to Tor.com! We Turn 11 Today and…Hey, What’s This?


This post is by Stubby the Rocket from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Stubby the Rocket Hogwarts letter Tor.com 11th birthday

Stubby the Rocket launched Tor.com 11 years ago today, on July 20, 2008! And after last year’s raucous 10 year birthday party we’re really looking forward to a cupcake or six and a nice quiet year ahea…

Erm, what’s this?

That envelope was definitely not there before.

(The unicorn definitely was.)

Stubby the Rocket Hogwarts letter Tor.com 11th birthday

 

We guess it could be a check from mom and dad, which is nice. We’re 11 so who knows how we’ll cash it, but…woah.

Stubby the Rocket Hogwarts letter Tor.com 11th birthday

 

WOAH.

Stubby the Rocket Hogwarts letter Tor.com 11th birthday

 

MINERVA.

Stubby the Rocket Hogwarts letter Tor.com 11th birthday

 

We suppose a rocket landing in Diagon Alley probably wouldn’t be the weirdest thing that happened there…

Stubby the Rocket Hogwarts letter Tor.com 11th birthday

 

Wait.

This explains a lot.

Stubby the Rocket Hogwarts letter Tor.com 11th birthday

 

We’re off to school! We’re going to be so good at Magical Creatures, you guys.

….

How’d the owl get in here?

Who Among Us? by Mario Benedetti review – a slippery love triangle


This post is by Jonathan Gibbs from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




An enticing novel about love and betrayal from a revered Uruguayan writer whose work is being translated into English at last

Mario Benedetti was a hugely cherished writer in his native Uruguay, amassing a bibliography of some 80 books by the time of his death in 2009, but he was not translated into English until recently. Now Nick Caistor has translated two short, splendid novels, both built around love triangles in which a woman – regretfully, cautiously – leaves her husband for another man.

In Springtime in a Broken Mirror, published last year, that wrench is made more poignant by the fact that the abandoned man is imprisoned abroad, a political prisoner. In Who Among Us? the setup is more straightforward, but still the woman’s choice to leave is a fraught one. Alicia’s 11-year marriage to her childhood sweetheart Miguel has given them two children, but it has faded ...

Will Eaves on Bath: ‘I could imagine Anne Elliot going for a walk’


This post is by Will Eaves from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The novelist remembers the Somerset city as a hodgepodge of styles and classes where tolerance and prejudice coexisted

Georgian Bath was built within a century, and a lot of it disappeared inside a decade – the 1960s – when I was born. Calton Road and many rows of listed buildings were still coming down when I was learning to walk, and the Ballance Street flats going up, but the Brussellisation of the city was something I grew to love, something I associate with the freedom to roam I enjoyed as a kid. Bath always had a violent side, but my parents weren’t overprotective. I walked to Beechen Cliff comp every day with my friend Rachid, and the route took us through all the architectural ages of man – the Corn Market, the Roman baths, the abbey, Southgate shopping centre (demolished 20 years ago) and, in the shadow of the cliff ...

From Clytemnestra to Villanelle: why are we fascinated by women who kill?


This post is by Sean O'Connor from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In both pop culture and reality, women killers both seduce and repel us. The writer behind The Archers’ gaslighting storyline explores our enduring obsession

About 2,500 years ago, an audience took their places at a theatre in Athens for the premiere of a new murder drama. The protagonist, a returning war hero, was savagely stabbed to death, naked in his bath. The crime was thought particularly heinous as the killer was the victim’s wife, Clytemnestra. Her name has become notorious for a uniquely feminine sort of villainy, and the story of the murder of her husband, Agamemnon, seen in Aeschylus’s play of the same title in 458BC, has become an archetypal domestic murder plot.

Even though female murderers are much rarer than male murderers in reality, the image of the female killer continues to fascinate. Killing Eve is just the latest example of popular culture’s preoccupation with attractive young women ...

The Great Successor by Anna Fifield review – the secrets of Kim Jong-un


This post is by Julian Borger from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




From spoilt child to ruthless dictator ... farce sits alongside horror in this excellent study of the North Korean leader

Wishful thinking is an underappreciated yet potent force in western foreign policy. When Kim Jong-un inherited his family’s dictatorship in North Korea at the age of 27, there were widespread predictions that his youth and Swiss education would make him an enlightened reformer. Who could experience the benefits of western democracy and not want it for their own country? The same optimism accompanied the rise of Bashar al-Assad in Syria, a British-trained ophthalmologist, and that of Mohammed Bin Salman in Saudi Arabia, who liked to hang out with tech entrepreneurs in California.

All three dauphins have proved more bloodthirsty and implacable than their fathers. Growing up in the cosseted confines of a ruling dynasty and being treated as a demigod from birth can warp the humanity out of anyone.

Continue reading...

Colson Whitehead: ‘We have kids in concentration camps. But I have to be hopeful’


This post is by Sukhdev Sandhu from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Underground Railroad made him a household name. Now the author is back with a ‘Trumpian novel’ – inspired by a horrifying but ignored part of US history

It is the summer of 2019 and Colson Whitehead is sitting in midtown Manhattan thinking back to the birth of his new novel, The Nickel Boys. “It was 2014,” he recalls, “and it was a rough summer in terms of race and police brutality. Michael Brown was shot by a white cop in Ferguson, Missouri. Eric Garner, who was selling bootleg cigarettes in Staten Island, was choked to death by a cop. And no one was being held accountable. No one was being disciplined or going to jail. And then I came across Dozier School.” The Arthur G Dozier school, more formally known as the Florida School for Boys, existed from 1900 to 2011 as a reform institution for ...

Plastic Emotions by Shiromi Pinto review – an architectural romance


This post is by Shahidha Bari from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The richly imagined story of an affair between Le Corbusier and Sri Lanka’s first modernist architect, Minnette de Silva

There’s an air of romance to nearly all the places Shiromi Pinto describes in Plastic Emotions, her novel about a love affair between two great 20th-century architects. Some of those places are tropical and alluring. In Sri Lanka, we head to Kandy with its verdant hills, and then Colombo with its chattering bourgeoisie. In India, Pinto takes us to Chandigarh and its elegantly experimental modernist buildings. Even in Paris and London, we are surrounded by the glamour of bohemians and their postwar parties. But it’s in the mildly prosaic confines of a conference in Bridgwater, Somerset, that the Swiss-French architect Le Corbusier seems first to have collided with a Sri Lankan architect called Minnette de Silva.

It’s there that the illustrious Congrès Internationaux d’Architecture Moderne descended in 1947 for a ...

From Ted Hughes to HG Wells: Jeanette Winterson picks the best books about the moon


This post is by Jeanette Winterson from Books | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Fifty years since Apollo 11 landed, the novelist shares her favourite books and poems about Earth’s mysterious satellite

There she is, 239,000 miles from Earth. A lover’s moon, a poet’s moon, a painted moon, made of green cheese, home to the Man in the Moon, visible above the lights of Moscow and Manhattan, Tokyo and London. Hanging as the silent guardian of rivers and woods. Symbol of the mystery of the universe.

None of this has changed since Apollo 11 landed on that broken silent surface 50 years ago. The moon is just as familiar and just as remote. The mythical and magical moon, the lunatic moon that drives men mad, Earth’s moon, lifting tides and raising sap.

Continue reading...

Get a First Look at Stormlight Archive Book 4, Courtesy of Brandon Sanderson!


This post is by Stubby the Rocket from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Brandon Sanderson Stormlight Archive Book 4 SDCC

The next book in Brandon Sanderson’s bestselling Stormlight Archive fantasy series is hugely anticipated, and at San Diego Comic Con 2019 we finally got our first look at the fourth volume, courtesy of a surprise video pop-in from the author!

Sanderson stopped by with a special update on the fourth Stormlight Archive book, and even read an excerpt from the work in progress!

The excerpt concerns Venli, sister of Eshonai. Watch:

Please note that this is an initial draft of the book, and that much may change between now and the book’s release!

Harriet McDougal Talks Robert Jordan’s New Book: Warrior of the Altaii


This post is by Tor.com from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Warrior of the Altaii Robert Jordan

Tor Books has revealed a bit more about Robert Jordan’s heretofore unseen first novel, Warrior of the Altaii, at this year’s San Diego Comic Con!

In a remote video played at San Diego Comic Con 2019, Founding Editorial Director of Tor Books–and Jordan’s editor and eventually wife–Harriet McDougal and Founder and Chairman of Tor Books Tom Doherty discuss the history of acquiring Jordan’s first novel and why they waited until now for publication. Doherty explains how McDougal acquired Warrior of the Altaii back in ’76, just as Jordan had switched his focus to The Wheel of Time series.

Check out McDougal’s description of a scene from Altaii below! (Also, Harriet McDougal should absolutely narrate suspense audiobooks.)

Note: Robert Jordan is the pen name of James Oliver Rigney, Jr. Hence why Harriet and Tom refer to him as Jim in the video below.

Draw near and listen, or else ...

V.E. Schwab Updates Fans on Book Progress at SDCC 2019


This post is by Stubby the Rocket from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




V.E. Schwab SDCC 2019

V.E. Schwab, author of the Shades of Magic series, recorded a message for San Diego Comic Con 2019 attendees to let them know about her progress on her next two books. Check it out!

In a short video, Schwab, chilling on a lovely pinstriped chair in the backyard of a lovely French country house, provides more detail about two of the books she is currently writing. The first one is The Invisible Life of Addie La Rue, about a girl who makes a Faustian bargain to live forever, only to be forgotten by everyone she meets. The story will delve into Addie’s relationship with the Devil over the course of 300 years, as well as a romantic relationship she has with a human boy over one year.

The Rise of Kylo Ren and More Star Wars Books Announced at SDCC!


This post is by Emily Asher-Perrin from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Rise of Kylo Ren, Marvel comics

The Lucasfilm Publishing Panel went down at San Diego Comic-Con to let us know what new Star Wars books and comics are coming up, leading all the way into The Rise of Skywalker! Get ready to stack your TBR list…

Here are the titles that were announced:

  • For the kids there will be Star Wars Creatures Big & Small by Katie Cook
  • Delilah S. Dawson will be penning The Skywalker Saga, presumably Episodes I-IX, told in a fairy tale style
  • Star Wars Myths & Fables by George Mann will feature lovely illustrations

  • In September, Marvel will be releasing Star Wars: Age of Resistance comics centering on Rey, Rose Tico, Supreme Leader Snoke, and Kylo Ren
  • There will be a “Journey to The Rise of Skywalker” publishing program starting ...

“We Ship Braime!” “The Night King Will Rule Westeros!” And Other Highlights From Game of Thrones’ Panel at SDCC 2019


This post is by Leah Schnelbach from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Game of Thrones Beyond the Wall

Some of Game of Thrones‘ cast gathered one final time to discuss Season 8 (and THAT FINALE) at San Diego Comic-Con. Maisie Williams (Arya Stark), Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (Jaime Lannister), Isaac Hempstead Wright (Bran Stark), John Bradley West (Samwell Tarly), Liam Cunningham (Davos Seaworth), Raleigh Ritchie (Greyworm), and Conleth Hill (Varys) all appeared, regaling Hall H with spoilers for a panel that closed with no time left for Q&A.

We’ve assembled highlights below—obviously this post is dark and full of spoilers!

The panel began with a reminder to be nice to the panelists, followed by a highlights reel from all eight seasons, ending on a voiceover from Sansa Stark saying, “The lone wolf dies, but the pack survives.”

With the cast assembled, the moderator starts with Isaac Hempstead-Wright, who says life since the finale has been great and that he asks his family to refer to him as “your ...

“We Ship Braime!” “The Night King Will Rule Westeros!” And Other Highlights From Game of Thrones’ Panel at SDCC 2019


This post is by Leah Schnelbach from Tor.com Frontpage Partial - Blog and Story Content


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Game of Thrones Beyond the Wall

Some of Game of Thrones‘ cast gathered one final time to discuss Season 8 (and THAT FINALE) at San Diego Comic-Con. Maisie Williams (Arya Stark), Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (Jaime Lannister), Isaac Hempstead Wright (Bran Stark), John Bradley West (Samwell Tarly), Liam Cunningham (Davos Seaworth), Raleigh Ritchie (Greyworm), and Conleth Hill (Varys) all appeared, regaling Hall H with spoilers for a panel that closed with no time left for Q&A.

We’ve assembled highlights below—obviously this post is dark and full of spoilers!

The panel began with a reminder to be nice to the panelists, followed by a highlights reel from all eight seasons, ending on a voiceover from Sansa Stark saying, “The lone wolf dies, but the pack survives.”

With the cast assembled, the moderator starts with Isaac Hempstead-Wright, who says life since the finale has been great and that he asks his family to refer to him as “your ...